Residents are returning to try and salvage their possessions from the wreckage.

Tonight: Tornadoes - Deadly Force

Tonight visits Oklahoma as it begins to rebuild after Monday's devastating tornado to find out what causes the deadly storms.

Live updates

Anglia

In Pictures: Tornado strikes on Suffolk-Norfolk border

A tornado pictured at Wortwell near Harleston, Norfolk Credit: Vikki Woodford

Eyewitness Vikki Woodford said she saw the tornado touch the ground at Wortwell on the Norfolk-Suffolk border.

Vikki wrote on the ITV News Anglia Facebook page: "I have pictures of it from Wortwell - very clear! We watched it touch down, videoed it then left before the storm was overhead."

She added that it then fizzled out.

There are no reports of any damage.

A tornado pictured at Wortwell near Harleston, Norfolk Credit: Vikki Woodford

See more of weather pictures from across the East Anglia region

Advertisement

Anglia

Thunderstorms and torrential downpours in Northamptonshire, Norfolk and Cambridgeshire

Rainfall radar image taken at 1.20pm. The pink and white areas indicates the heaviest downpours. Credit: Met Office

Torrential downpours and thunderstorms are currently tracking across Northamptonshire and into Cambridgeshire and Norfolk, heading north east towards The Wash.

Areas on the rainfall radar map coloured white indicate rainfall rates of more than 32 mm per hour.

Read more: Met Office yellow weather warning for heavy rain

Read more: The latest Anglia Weather forecast

Rainfall radar image at 3.20pm showing the thunderstorms clearing away to the north Credit: Met Office
Rainfall radar image at 1pm showing thunderstorms moving north east towards The Wash Credit: Met Office

Email your weather pictures to angliaweather@itv.com

One killed as rare twin tornadoes hit central US

One person was killed and at least 16 injured after severe storms hit the central United States.

Rare twin tornadoes slammed the town of Blair north of Omaha in Nebraska, with storm chasers reporting several tornado touchdowns in the area.

Dozens of flights were cancelled due to the weather that produced strong winds and cricket ball-sized hail.

Advertisement

Search and rescue turns to clean up after US tornadoes

A worker at Mayflower RV retrieves wheels from a trailer destroyed in Mayflower, Arkansas.
A worker at Mayflower RV retrieves wheels from a trailer destroyed in Mayflower, Arkansas. Credit: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Search-and-rescue efforts have turned to a cleanup operation are underway after a string of tornadoes ripped across large parts of central and southern United States, leaving at least 34 people dead.

Theresa Long inside her destroyed house in Mayflower, Arkansas.
Theresa Long inside her destroyed house in Mayflower, Arkansas. Credit: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Emergency recovery clear-up crews and volunteers have been working to clear mass piles of debris scattered across affected regions as the disaster has left many residents with no possessions.

At least 34 dead after tornadoes hit the south of US

At least 34 people were killed in tornadoes in the south of America over the past three days.

The hardest of the six states hit were Arkansas and Mississippi, with over 27 storm related deaths accounted for and more than 200 people injured.

Deaths were also reported in Oklahoma and Iowa on Sunday, and Alabama and Tennessee on Monday.

Shane and wife Alexis Cauthen of The Valley Church hug after they were cleaning up what was their chapel in Vilonia. Credit: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

More: 'At least 30 dead' after tornadoes rip through US

'At least 28 people dead' after chain of tornadoes in US

At least 28 people are dead and tens of thousands without power after a storm system spawned a chain of tornadoes over three days across a large swath of the US, the Associated Press reported.

A US flag sticks out the window of a damaged hot rod car near near Vilonia, Arkansas.
A US flag sticks out the window of a damaged hot rod car near near Vilonia, Arkansas. Credit: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

The storms flattened homes and businesses and forced frightened residents in more than half a dozen states to take cover.

Load more updates

Advertisement

Today's top stories