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'No improvements in services' despite fare increases

The 10th above-inflation increase in a row led a campaign group to claim that the increases come at a time of "no perceptible improvement in services."

Last week Railfuture spokesman Bruce Williamson said: "Yet again, rail fares go up with no perceptible improvement in service.

"Over the last 10 years, fares have increased by more than 50% - much more than people's incomes."

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Cameron 'misled commuters with fare rise cap'

David Cameron misled commuters when he promised to cap fare rises at 1% above inflation.

Many commuters have faced a nasty New Year shock as they discover fares have gone up by as much as 9.2%.

The Government should come clean with commuters that this is a direct result of their decision to cave in to pressure from the private train companies to let them hike ticket prices beyond the so-called cap.

– Shadow transport secretary Maria Eagle

Government defends rail fare hikes

Family budgets are being squeezed, so that is why this coalition Government has taken proactive steps to cut the planned fare rises from 3% to 1% above inflation until 2014.

We are engaged in the biggest rail investment programme since the 19th century and it is only right that the passenger, as well as the taxpayer, contributes towards that.

In the longer term we are determined to reduce the cost of running the railways so that we can end the era of above-inflation fare rises.

– Transport Minister Norman Baker

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Government 'to blame for rail fare hikes'

We understand commuters don't like to pay more to travel to work but it is the Government, not train companies, that decides how much season tickets should rise on average each year.

Successive governments have required train companies to increase the average price of season tickets every January since 2004 by more than inflation.

Ministers want passengers to pay a larger share of railway running costs to reduce the contribution from taxpayers while sustaining investment in better stations, new trains and faster services.

– Michael Roberts, chief executive of the Association of Train Operating Companies

Rail commuters 'set for another year of fare misery'

I understand the frustration felt by many commuters going back to work today.

At a time when real wages are falling and household budgets are being squeezed, rail travellers are being forced to endure yet another year of inflation-busting fare increases.

As well as having to shell out record amounts of money for their tickets, passengers also face the prospect of travelling on trains with fewer staff and having less access to ticket offices. They are being asked to pay much more for less.

– TUC general secretary Frances O'Grady

Rail fares have 'gone up 50 per cent' in last decade

Some season ticket holders have seen their fares rise by more than 50% in the last 10 years, campaigners have said.

The Campaign for Better Transport (CBT) said its research showed that in the last decade London commuters have seen:

  • Average season ticket costs increase by £1,300.
  • Fares grow 20% faster than wages.
  • Average costs in real terms increasing by £360.

It added that in the last 10 years rail fares had gone up substantially in all parts of England but that there were significant differences between routes over that period:

  • Annual fares from Ashford International in Kent to London have risen by more than £2,000.
  • Fares from Sevenoaks in Kent to London have increased by nearly 90%, from £1,660 to £3,112.
  • In contrast, fares from Stevenage in Hertfordshire to London have risen by £772 - an increase of 30%, but below the increase generated by inflation alone.

Rail commuters hit by fare rises

The mid-winter will be bleaker for millions of rail travellers today as inflation-busting fare rises take effect after the festive break.

Millions of commuters are heading back to work today Credit: Tim Ireland/PA Archive

Regulated fares, which include season tickets, are increasing by an average of 4.2%, with the overall average rise for all tickets being 3.9%.

The rise follows a miserable few weeks for many commuters who have had to contend with floods, signal failures and, on some routes, staff shortages.

Campaign groups have pointed out yesterday's increase is the 10th successive above-inflation rise, with some rail season ticket holders seeing their fares rise by more than 50% in the last 10 years.

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