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Man sacked from stockbrokers over 'I hit a cyclist' tweet

Rayhan Qadar’s tweet that led to his dismissal from Hargreaves Lansdown Credit: SWNS

A Twitter user who was investigated by police after posting a "joke" message saying that he had driven off after hitting a cyclist has been sacked from his job at a major fund broker.

Writing under the account name Ray Pew, Rayhan Qadar tweeted yesterday: "Think I just hit a cyclist. But I'm late for work so had to drive off lol."

The 21-year-old, who later retracted the tweet and apologised online, told reporters it was a "a made up thing" and "a joke gone bad," The Bristol Post reported.

"I am 100 per cent sorry," the former Cardiff University student said.

But the apology was not sufficient to save his job at Bristol-based Hargreaves Lansdown.

One of our employees has failed to conduct themselves to the standards we expect of our staff. We find these online comments totally unacceptable.

Upon becoming aware of this issue we have terminated this person's employment with immediate effect.

– Hargreaves Lansdown spokesman


Katie Hopkins' fury at being reported to police over tweets

Controversial TV personality Katie Hopkins launched an attack on people who "dial the cop shop every time we feel offended online" after she was reported to police over her Twitter outburst about the Scottish nurse who is battling Ebola.

Outspoken TV personality Katie Hopkins was berated online after she made the comments. Credit: Ian West/PA Archive/Press Association Images

Hopkins was berated online after she wrote on the site about "little sweaty jocks", adding: "Sending us ebola bombs in the form of sweaty Glaswegians just isn't cricket."

In a separate message, she tweeted: "Glaswegian ebola patient moved to London's Royal Free Hospital. Not so independent when it matters most are we jocksville?"

Police Scotland confirmed they were looking into complaints they had received.

I have always maintained the Boys in Blue have far better things to do than police Twitter.

But instead of argument, reasoned debate, discussion or avoidance, we now dial the cop shop every time we feel offended online.

Since when did telling teacher ever solve an argument in the playground?

The freedom to say only things that are polite is no real freedom of speech at all.

– Katie Hopkins

Hopkins' column does not appear in the Scottish Sun.

Shapps: Politicians should not use Twitter 'to judge the public'

Conservative party chairman Grant Shapps has said politicians should not be using Twitter to judge the public but that the public should be judging politicians, after Emily Thornberry's tweet led to her resigning from the front bench.

Tonight's panel on The Agenda with Tom Bradby. Credit: Twitter/ @agendaitv

Speaking as one of the guests on The Agenda with Tom Bradby Mr Shapps said it was still important for MPs to be on Twitter: "Politicians can either hide away or they can be out there. It's not just tweeting - it's about replying to people who tweet to you."

Other guests on the programme on ITV at 10.35pm tonight are feminist writer Germaine Greer, poet Benjamin Zephaniah and Telegraph Women's Editor, Emma Barnett.


Queen gets trolled on Twitter after sending debut tweet

The Queen has been targeted by Twitter trolls after sending her first royal tweet.

The Queen has been targeted by Twitter trolls after sending her first royal tweet. Credit: @BritishMonarchy

The official @BritishMonarchy account she used saw its followers grow by tens of thousands, but was immediately attacked by trolls sending abusive messages.

A Buckingham Palace spokesman said: "We were fully cognisant of the nature of Twitter, where anyone anywhere can express their opinion, but we were delighted that so many people - in their tens of thousands - responded positively.

"We saw some tweets with profanity but that is just the nature of the format."

Scotland Yard said it had not received any complaints and was not investigating the matter.

Twitter sues US government for details of user surveillance

Twitter suing the US Department of Justice and the FBI to provide more details about the extent of US government surveillance.

The lawsuit, filed on Tuesday, follows an agreement between internet companies like Google and Microsoft with the government about court orders they receive related to surveillance.

"We've tried to achieve the level of transparency our users deserve without litigation, but to no avail," Twitter said in ablog post.

Twitter said it was "asking the court to declare these restrictions on our ability to speak about government surveillance as unconstitutional under the First Amendment."

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