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King Richard III was buried in an 'untidy' grave

The remains of King Richard III were found in a hastily dug, untidy grave, researchers have revealed.

The last Plantagenet king was discovered under a city car park, placed casually in a badly prepared grave, academics from the University of Leicester said.

Read: Search for Richard III ends with car park dig

The remains of King Richard III, which were discovered under a city car park and were found in a hastily dug, untidy grave.
The remains of King Richard III, which were discovered under a city car park and were found in a hastily dug, untidy grave. Credit: University of Leicester/PA Wire

His position suggests that gravediggers were in a hurry to bury him or had little respect for the murdered king, they added.

Researchers said there was evidence to suggest his hands might have been tied when he was buried, and that he was placed in an odd position, with his torso crammed in.

The findings were revealed as University of Leicester archaeologists published the first peer-reviewed paper on the university-led archaeological Search for Richard III in the journal Antiquity.

To read more about the search for King Richard III, visit ITV News Central.

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Richard III's tomb proposals revealed

What the tomb could look like Credit: Richard III Society

The design proposals for the tomb where Richard lll will finally be laid to rest have been unveiled.

It has been confirmed his remains will be reburied in Leicester, after they were discovered underneath a car park in the City last year. No date has been set for the reinterment but it is expected to take place next spring.

The tomb design was commissioned by Philippa Langley – from the Richard lll Society who was behind the search.

The design was undertaken by a team of specialists with more than 40 years of research into Richard III. It was first proposed in drawing form in September 2010, and then preliminary images were presented in August 2011.

The tomb design was commissioned by Philippa Langley – the originator who searched for Richard III Credit: Richard III Society

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Picture: Did this weapon kill Richard III?

Royal Armouries weapons
Experts at the Royal Armouries in Leeds have revealed the sort of weapons which may have been used to kill Richard III Credit: ITV Calendar

Experts at the Royal Armouries in Leeds have revealed the sort of weapons which may have been used to kill Richard III.

Archaeologists in the midlands yesterday confirmed they had discovered the body of the last king of the House of York. Now a Leeds historian is piecing together just what happened to the man who gave battle in vain.

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The face of Richard III officially unveiled to the world's media

After centuries of speculation, the face of King Richard III has been unveiled

A reconstruction of the head of King Richard III has been unveiled to the world's media in London following yesterday's announcement that his skeleton had been found under a Leicester car park.

The model was built using a CT scan taken of the king's skull by the archaeological dig.

The unveiling is being held at The Society of Antiquaries in London.

Read about the discovery of the King of England in a Leicester Car Park here.

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'We have searched for Richard and we have found him'

"Wow, today marks the culmination of an extraordinary journey of discovery.

We have searched for Richard and we have found him, now it is time to honour him."

– Philippa Langley, Richard III Society

She describes how it was a near-miss. The dig almost got cancelled because one of the funding bodies pulled out.

The tomb design will be revealed in the next few weeks.

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Remains were found on the first day of excavation

The scientists now start to give their evidence, starting with Lead Archeologist Richard Buckley.

He describes how challenging it was to find the burial site, given the modern day building works and how he chose where to start digging.

Richard Buckley
Richard Buckley Credit: ITV Central
Dig site map
Dig site map Credit: ITV Central

They started digging on 25th August 2012 and quickly found archeological remains including tile flooring.

The skeleton found had two distinctive traits - curvature of the spine and evidence of trauma to the skull.

The evidence in presented
The evidence in presented Credit: ITV Central

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