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Expert: Quakes like today's 'happen every 2-3 years'

Dr Susanne Sergeant of the British Geological Survey told ITV News earthquakes like today's 4.1 magnitude "tend to happen in the UK once every two-three years on average".

The largest earthquake recorded in the UK was a 6.1 magnitude, hitting Dogger Bank in the North Sea in June 1931.

The red areas on this map show instrumental earthquakes, the blue show historical.
The red areas on this map show instrumental earthquakes, the blue show historical. Credit: British Geological Survey

"It released approximately 900 times more energy than today's earthquake," Dr Sergeant said.

Speaking of today's earthquake, she said: "I am not aware of any reports of damage - because the earthquake happened in the Bristol Channel (about 20 km north of Ilfracombe), the area of strongest shaking would have been under the sea.

"It would not be unusual for this earthquake to be followed by aftershocks".

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Bristol Channel earthquake measured 4.1 magnitude

The earthquake that struck the Bristol Channel at 1.21pm today measured 4.1 magnitude, the British Geological Survey (BGS) has confirmed.

British Geological Survey map showing the location of the earthquake's epicentre.
British Geological Survey map showing the location of the earthquake's epicentre. Credit: British Geological Survey

It's epicentre was located around 18 km (11 miles) north of Ilfracombe in North Devon and 30 km (18.6 miles) southwest of Swansea.

"The earthquake was widely felt in North Devon and South Wales", the BGS added.

Read: Bristol Channel earthquake felt in Wales and South West

Wales

Your earthquake experiences needed for research

This map shows the distribution of intensities so far for the earthquake in south-west Wales Credit: Google Maps / BGS

Did you feel an earthquake this afternoon in Swansea, Llanelli or another area of south-west Wales?

The British Geological Survey is asking people to share their experiences to help them build a better picture of the quake.

The map above, in its early stages, shows the intensity of the earthquake felt in different areas.

You can add your observations by visiting the British Geological Survey's website here.

Wales

Swansea residents report feeling small earthquake

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Did we just have a little earthquake in Swansea? The walls of my house & all my furniture just shook for like 3 seconds. Weird.

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Erm, anyone else in the Swansea area just felt their house move? #earthquake?

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Parents will 'cherish little time they had with Eliza-Mae'

The parents of six-day-old Eliza-Mae, who is thought to have been killed by the family dog, said they will "cherish the little time we were able to share with her".

Eliza-Mae Mullane was airlifted to the University of Wales Hospital in Cardiff yesterday after what is thought to have been an attack by the family's Alaskan malamute dog.

Eliza-Mae died suddenly at a property in the village of Pontyberem. Credit: Family Handout

"Even though she was an important part of our family for such a short period of time, Eliza-Mae will always be in our hearts and thoughts and we will cherish the little time we were able to share with her," Sharon John and Patrick Mullane said in a statement.

"She was a dearly loved daughter, sister, granddaughter and niece. She brought joy into our family, and losing her like this has cast the most horrible shadow over all of us.

"There are no words we can use to describe what we feel at the moment, and we don't think there ever will be."

Dog breed seized after baby death 'have kind natures'

The Alaskan Malamute, the breed of dog seized from a family home following the death of a six-day-old girl, are large and powerful, but have kind and affectionate natures, according to an expert from The Kennel Club.

"They often live in family situations and are extremely loyal," Bill Lambert, the club's health and breeder services manager said.

He confirmed that the breed is not listed under the Dangerous Dogs Act, adding:

The list demonises certain breeds of dog, and we have to look far deeper than that.

The Dangerous Dogs Act is all about the appearance of the dog, and actually ownership and training of the dog is more important. Any large, powerful dog does have the capacity to cause harm.

The Alaskan Malamute is a Husky-type dog "bred originally for pulling sledges, and they weigh, fully grown, something like 75 to 85 pounds."

Baby death: Girl had only been home for two nights

by Neil Connery in Pontyberem, Carmarthenshire

Neighbours have been re-living the horrific events here this morning as the emergency services battled to save Eliza-Mae's life - she was just six days old.

She had spent the first three days of her life in an intensive care unit. She only came home at the weekend and spent two nights in the nursery inside the house.

The joy of homecoming for her parents Patrick and Sharon shattered in a matter of moments this morning.

Police have seized the family's pet dog - it is an Alaskan Malamute like the one pictured here. It is not a banned dog under the Dangerous Dogs Act.

File photograph of an Alaskan Malamute - the breed of dog seized by police after the baby's death.
File photograph of an Alaskan Malamute - the breed of dog seized by police after the baby's death. Credit: ITV News

Police are awaiting the results of a post-mortem examination, but what is clear is that this community is in shock tonight at what has happened.

Read: Police seize dog after death of baby in Wales

Police 'not in position to confirm cause of baby's death'

Dyfed Powys Police said they are "not in a position to confirm the exact cause of death" of a six-day-old girl who died at a property in a Carmarthenshire village

Eliza-Mae Mullane's death prompted police to seize the family's dog, which was an Alaskan Malamute.

A police spokeswoman said: "The police investigation is ongoing. We are not in a position to confirm the exact cause of death or the injuries to the baby at the moment.

"We are not going to speculate on reports from people in the community and we respectfully ask that you wait for the investigation to run its proper course."

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