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A grave at last for the men of Bomber Command

by - Europe Correspondent

Sixty-eight years after they were shot down by enemy fire, a grave at last for the men of Bomber Command.

The service for the men of Bomber Command. Credit: ITV News

The four who flew together and died together will be buried together in the War Cemetery in Padua. A chance their families thought was lost after decades without news.

The bodies of Sergeant David Raikes, 20, Flight Sergeant Alexander Bostock, 20, Flight Sergeant David Millard, 20 and Warrant Officer John Hunt, 21, were recovered in July 2011 after a team of archaeologists discovered the wreckage of their Boston Bomber 5m below ground in the Po Valley, Italy.

They died in the last days of the war in Italy but no trace of their wreckage was ever found and their families were left to grieve without a body.

Those families will be at the service today, to honour their service and sacrifice.

Read: Belongings of WW2 pilots returned to their families almost 70 years on

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World War II bomber lifted from its watery grave

The only surviving German Second World War Dornier Do 17 bomber has been lifted from its watery grave in the English Channel. The aircraft was shot down off the Kent coast more than 70 years ago during the Battle of Britain.

Lifting equipment raises a World War II Dornier bomber
Lifting equipment raises a World War II Dornier bomber Credit: PA Wire

The project is believed to be the biggest recovery of its kind in British waters. Attempts by the RAF Museum to raise the relic over the last few weeks have been hit by strong winds but today, the operation was finally successful.

The bomber was raised from the English Channel
The bomber was raised from the English Channel Credit: PA Wire

Irish soldiers 'pardoned' for fighting in World War Two

Thousands of Irish soldiers who joined the British Army to fight Nazi Germany will be officially pardoned today.

The Irish Government will pass special legislation which grants an amnesty to the former troops who were branded deserters for joining up.

Rules bought in during the Second World War saw these ex-soldiers face widespread discrimination such as being barred from state jobs and refused military pensions.

Dublin's Justice Minister, Alan Shatter said "unfortunately, many of the individuals whose situation is addressed in this Bill did not live to see the day that this state finally acknowledged the important role that they played in seeking to ensure a free and safe Europe."

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