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Angel of the North coins go into circulation

The Angel of the North features on a new A-Z of British coins. Photo: Royal Mint

New 10 pence coins featuring the Angel of the North go into circulation in Gateshead this weekend.

The iconic sculpture designed by Sir Anthony Gormley was completed in 1998, and is celebrating its 20th birthday this year.

The Royal Mint has created an A-Z of 10p pieces for its 'Great British Coin Hunt'.

'A' is for Angel of the North.

A limited number of the Angel coins have been placed in tills at Gateshead Leisure Centre cafe and Gateshead Central Library shop this weekend, where visitors may find them in their change.

The Angel of the North stands 20 metres tall and has a wingspan of 54 metres. Credit: PA

We were honoured when we received the call from The Royal Mint to discuss the Angel of the North as the design for one of the new 10p coins.

The Angel is not just an icon for Gateshead and the North East, it's an international landmark which has brought regeneration, jobs and pride to the area.

This is a fitting tribute to the sculpture currently celebrating its 20th anniversary.

We're delighted that we now have some of the new coins in our tills and we would encourage everyone to visit Gateshead Leisure Centre and Gateshead Central Library to see if they find an Angel in their change.

– Councillor Angela Douglas, Gateshead Council Cabinet Member for Culture, Sport and Leisure

All 26 coins are being released into circulation across the country this year.

Here are the others:

B is for Bond... James Bond. Credit: Royal Mint
C is for cricket. Credit: Royal Mint
D is for double decker bus. Credit: Royal Mint
E is for English breakfast. Credit: Royal Mint
F is for fish & chips. Credit: Royal Mint
G is for Greenwich Mean Time. Credit: Royal Mint
H is for Houses of Parliament. Credit: Royal Mint
I is for ice cream. Credit: Royal Mint
J is for jubilee. Credit: Royal Mint
K is for King Arthur. Credit: Royal Mint
L is for Loch Ness. Credit: Royal Mint
M is for mackintosh. Credit: Royal Mint
N is for NHS. Credit: Royal Mint
O is for oak tree. Credit: Royal Mint
P is for postbox. Credit: Royal Mint
Q is for queuing. Credit: Royal Mint
R is for robin. Credit: Royal Mint
S is for Stonehenge. Credit: Royal Mint
T is for tea. Credit: Royal Mint
U is for Union Jack. Credit: Royal Mint
V is for villages. Credit: Royal Mint
W is for World Wide Web. Credit: Royal Coin
X is for X marks the spot. Credit: Royal Mint
Y is for yeoman warder. Credit: Royal Mint
Z is for zebra crossing. Credit: Royal Mint