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'This will be a Godsend...' says Dec after opening new accommodation at the Freeman Hospital

After opening new accommodation at the Freeman Hospital, alongside Alan Shearer, Declan Donnelly, from celebrity duo Ant & Dec said the opportunity for families to be able to stay with their children during their heart operations 'at a really incredibly stressful time' would be 'a Godsend'.

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Ant & Dec and Alan Shearer opening new accommodation at the Freeman Hospital

Ant & Dec with Alan Shearer after his Testimonial match in 2006. Credit: PA

Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly (Ant & Dec) are opening brand new family accommodation for families of child heart patients at the Freeman Hospital in Newcastle.

The celebrity presenters and Newcastle United legend are unveiling Scott House, a £1.85mil ‘Home for Home’, as part of their work for the The Sick Children's Trust and Children's Heart Unit Fund (CHUF), where they are patrons.

Alan Shearer with 7-year-old Sadie Metin at the Freeman Hospital in Newcastle. Credit: PA

The free accommodation hopes to give emotional, as well as practical support for families through en-suite rooms and a self-contained flat for families with children who have undergone a heart transplant.

The Sick Children's Trust was founded in 1982 by two paediatric specialists Dr Jon Pritchard and Professor James Malpas, who believed that having parents on hand during hospital treatment benefited a child's recovery.

Body Worlds Vital exhibition extended in Newcastle

Having broken all visitor number records, Body Worlds Vital, the exhibition of real human bodies, is extending its run at the Life Science Centre in Newcastle.

The exhibition, which has been seen by over 100,000 visitors since opening in May, will now be at Life until 30th November 2014.

Body Worlds Vital is one of six exhibitions from anatomist Dr. Gunther von Hagens and aims to celebrate the living body in its optimal state. It explores the human anatomy, how the body functions and what happens when disease strikes.

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New genome study gives "hope for future"

"This is incredibly exciting news and has the potential to make a huge difference to the way we treat patients in the future. Sequencing the genome will give us new insights into the way genetic diseases develop. In Newcastle the focus is on rare diseases and while these illnesses may be uncommon, their symptoms have a huge impact on the people who have them and their families. Unlocking the mechanisms involved gives them hope for the future."

– Sir John Burn, Professor of Clinical Genetics at Newcastle University
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