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Dr John Sentamu: Church must offer "full apology" to sex abuse victims

Dr John Sentamu
The Archbishop of York says abuse victims will be listened to Credit: PA

The Archbishop of York has ordered an independent review of all files on deceased clergy who served in the Diocese of York from before 1950 up to the present day. Last month, the General Synod voted to ensure that victims of abuse are listened to.

In a statement today, the Archbishop said that the church must "acknowledge the hurt which has been done, to offer a full apology to offer a full apology, and to prove, so far as is possible, that policies and practices are improved such that the same systematic failure could never be repeated"

Archbishop of York announces review of dead clergy files

In a further move to address allegations of sexual abuse by Church of England clergy, the Archbishop of York has ordered an independent review of all files on deceased clergy who served in the Diocese of York from before 1950 up to the present day.

Last month, the General Synod voted to apologise for "past safeguarding wrongs" in the Church of England, and to ensure that victims of abuse are listened to.

Dr John Sentamu has already ordered an independent review into the Church’s handling of reports of alleged child abuse by the late Robert Waddington, a former Dean of Manchester.

In a statement today, the Archbishop said:

The damage done by the sexual abuse of children is immense, and the passage of time does not in itself bring healing. Where young people are shown to have been betrayed by individuals in a position of trust and by the institution’s failure to protect them, it is for the Church to acknowledge the hurt which has been done, to offer a full apology, and to prove, so far as is possible, that policies and practices are improved such that the same systemic failure could never be repeated.”

– Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu

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Full Report: Catholic Diocese of Middlesbrough liable for victims of abuse

A court has ruled that the Roman Catholic Diocese of Middlesbrough is not solely responsible for paying-out eight milion pounds in compensation to victims of alleged abuse at a former Catholic school near York.

A hundred and seventy former pupils at St William's school claim to have suffered appalling physical and sexual abuse within the home.

The diocese believe that the Roman Catholic Order of Brothers, which it hired to run the school, should share liability.

Today, in a landmark ruling, a judge at the Supreme Court agreed.

You can watch the full report from Kenny Toal below.

"It will never leave us"

170 former pupils say that they were victims of a brutal regime which went unchecked for thirty years at St WIlliams School, where it is alleged that a catalogue of sexual and physical abuse took place.

Whilst the Supreme Court's decision is seen to be a landmark for securing liability for the cases of abuse at the school, it will not bring the closure that victims like Lance Basnett need.

Diocese felt "it was unjust" to be held solely responsible

170 former pupils at St William's school in Middlesbrough claim that they suffered appalling physical and sexual abuse within the home.

The diocese claimed the Roman Catholic De La Salle Order of Brothers, which it hired to run the school, should share the liability for the cases of abuse.

In a landmark ruling, a judge at the Supreme Court agreed that the liability did not solely lie with the diocese.

Dr Jim Whiston says that the decision made by the Supreme Court has vindicated the diocese's view.

"Absolute scandal" that victims made to wait so long

A court has ruled that the Roman Catholic Diocese of Middlesbrough is not solely responsible for paying-out eight milion pounds in compensation to alleged victims of abuse at a former Catholic school near York.

The diocese claimed the Roman Catholic De La Salle Order of Brothers, which it hired to run the school, should share liability.

Keith Porteous Wood, of the National Secular Society, believes that it is wrong that people have had to wait so long for the necessary compensation.

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Landmark judgement holds two Catholic organisations responsible for abuse

The Supreme Court has ruled that two Catholic organisations are jointly responsible for alleged physical and sexual abuse at a children's home.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Middlesbrough and the De La Salle Roman Catholic Order, who supplied teachers, have both been held liable.

More than 170 victims came forward to report abuse at St William's care home and school in Market Weighton, near York. Abuse dating back to 1958.

The school came under the jurisdiction of the Middlesbrough diocese, but the De La Salle order was in day-to-day charge of running the place.

The Middlesbrough Diocese did not contest its responsibility for what happened. But it insisted the De La Salle order should also be held responsible for compensating any victims.

Today in a landmark ruling the Supreme Court agreed.

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