Live updates

Evidence of Roman settlement at Durham Cathedral

Durham Cathedral: once a Roman settlement, according to new evidence. Credit: PA
Hard at work: the team includes archaeologists from Durham University. Credit: ITV News Tyne Tees
Hidden treasure: the archaeologists have uncovered a wealth of material from several periods of history. Credit: ITV News Tyne Tees

Archaeologists have discovered evidence of a Roman settlement on the peninsula where Durham Cathedral now stands.

They have unearthed samian ware, a type of glossy red pottery from the Roman era.

The team of archaeologists, which includes specialists from Durham University, are also studying the lives of medieval monks.

Advertisement

Council pleased with lighting award

Durham Cathedral and Castle has been recognised with a top international lighting award for its outdoor floodlights.

John Reed, head of technical services at Durham Council Council, said:

"To get third prize out of 26 projects shortlisted around the globe is an outstanding achievement. Our scheme uses exterior floodlighting that it not only spectacular but also minimises the environmental footprint. It literally shows our World Heritage Sites in the best possible light."

– John Reed, Durham Council Council

Durham given top lighting award

Durham Cathedral Credit: Anna Gowthorpe/PA Archive/Press Association Images

Durham Cathedral and Castle has been given a top international lighting award.

The venues new energy efficient floodlights, which are managed by Durham County Council, were shortlisted in the top three at the prestigious Auroralia Awards, a scheme recognising sustainable lighting.

The floodlights have flexible control systems which enable the light intensity to be varied. On and off times can also be altered to respond to changing circumstances and for special events.

Church helps build cathedral Lego model

Gillian Britton, who coordinated the build at St Paul's Church in Spennymoor, said:

"It has been a fantastic opportunity to play our small part in helping to create a replica of this iconic building. We have been overwhelmed with the local community's support for this fundraiser and now we are looking forward to seeing our sections added to the model."

– Gillian Britton, St Paul's Church

Cathedral grateful for church donation

Gaye Kirby, Head of Development at Durham Cathedral said:

"We are very grateful to members of St Paul's church, both young and old, for helping us to build two sections of Durham Cathedral in LEGO bricks.

"Durham Cathedral in LEGO is a 'hands-on' fundraising initiative which we hope will attract support from across the Diocese. Our target is to raise £300,000 towards our £1 million public appeal for Open Treasure, the Cathedral's major development project which will transform the experience of those visiting Durham Cathedral."

– Gaye Kirby, Head of Development at Durham Cathedral

Advertisement

Spennymoor church adds to cathedral lego model

Parishioners from St Paul’s placing their completed section on the Lego model Credit: Durham Cathedral

Members of a Spennymoor church have added two completed sections to a Lego replica of Durham Cathedral.

The congregation from St Paul's Church have been building the sections over the past few weeks. Donors bought a single brick for £1 each, raising £260. The two sections - a double and single archway - will form part of the Nave once added to the rest of the model.

Report: Last chance to see the Lindisfarne Gospels

Today is the last chance to see the Lindisfarne Gospels at Durham Cathedral. It brings to an end a three month exhibition in the centre of Durham City.

Almost 100,000 people have been to see the gospels, which will be returned to the British Library later this week.

They attracted visitors from across the world and have brought in millions of pounds to the region.

Frances Read reports.

Last chance to see the Lindisfarne Gospels

The Lindisfarne Gospels has been on display there since the beginning of July.

Today is the last chance to see the Lindisfarne Gospels at Durham Cathedral.

The book has been on display there since the beginning of July.

During that time, 100,000 tickets for the exhibition were sold. It all comes to an end this evening, September 30.

The book will be returned to its permanent home in the British Library in London in the next week.

The Lindisfarne Gospels will be returned to its permanent home in the British Library in London. Credit: ITV News Tyne Tees

Full report: Mysterious bottle opened in Durham

A mysterious bottle - with a message inside it - has been unearthed at Durham Cathedral. It was found under a flagstone in one of the building's chapels.

A team of historians opened the bottle this morning, September 27, to read its message and maybe discover where it came from.

Our reporter Jonny Blair joined them as they tried to solve the mystery.

Load more updates

Advertisement

Today's top stories