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Ancient skeleton had artery disease

Artery disease has been affecting human health for at least 3,000 years, new research from Durham University says.

Ancient African skeletons have been discovered with atherosclerosis - a thickening of the artery wall due to a fatty build up.

And while doctors today blame modern lifestyles as the cause of artery problems, the research shows it was common about farming communities who worked close to the Nile, which is now the Sudan.

The study has been published in the International Journal of Palaeopathology

It forms part of a British Museum archaeological project.

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Family demand fresh answers for son's mystery death

Julie and Les Sheppard are campaigning for more support for British abroad Credit: ITV News Border

Julie and Les Sheppard are travelling from Selkirk to London to demand answers for their son's death.

Andrew Watt died in France four years ago. His parents argue that there was a lack of support from the British foreign office to find out the details of their son's death.

When the son's body returned to the UK it was discovered his heart and brain had been removed.

Last October the pair joined other families whose relatives had died abroad and protested about the lack of support available in that situation.

Julie and Les Sheppard will join other angry families at London's foreign Office on Tuesday at 11am in a bid to get their voices heard.

Every energy technology has associated risk

Researchers at Durham University have published a major report looking into the dangers of fracking. They say fracking, which involves fracturing rocks to release shale gas, is relatively safe. But drilling boreholes, whether for fracking or not, is potentially dangerous.

Richard Davies from Durham University says there is some sort of risk with every energy technology.

Archaeologists find Civil War artefacts at Auckland Castle

An archaeologist explores a trench at Auckland Castle, Bishop Auckland. The team have found fragments of a stained glass window, pottery, and charred bricks which could have come from an explosion during the Civil Qar era.

An archaeologist explores a trench at Auckland Castle, Bishop Auckland
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