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Family demand fresh answers for son's mystery death

Julie and Les Sheppard are campaigning for more support for British abroad Credit: ITV News Border

Julie and Les Sheppard are travelling from Selkirk to London to demand answers for their son's death.

Andrew Watt died in France four years ago. His parents argue that there was a lack of support from the British foreign office to find out the details of their son's death.

When the son's body returned to the UK it was discovered his heart and brain had been removed.

Last October the pair joined other families whose relatives had died abroad and protested about the lack of support available in that situation.

Julie and Les Sheppard will join other angry families at London's foreign Office on Tuesday at 11am in a bid to get their voices heard.

Every energy technology has associated risk

Researchers at Durham University have published a major report looking into the dangers of fracking. They say fracking, which involves fracturing rocks to release shale gas, is relatively safe. But drilling boreholes, whether for fracking or not, is potentially dangerous.

Richard Davies from Durham University says there is some sort of risk with every energy technology.

Fracking report released

Fracking releases energy trapped underground

Researchers at Durham University have published a major report looking into the dangers of fracking.

They say the process, which involves fracturing rocks to release shale gas, is relatively safe.

But they warn that drilling boreholes, whether for fracking or for any other reason, is potentially dangerous.

Archaeologists find Civil War artefacts at Auckland Castle

An archaeologist explores a trench at Auckland Castle, Bishop Auckland. The team have found fragments of a stained glass window, pottery, and charred bricks which could have come from an explosion during the Civil Qar era.

An archaeologist explores a trench at Auckland Castle, Bishop Auckland

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Archaeologists uncover building remains at Auckland Castle site

A team from Durham University is digging in the grounds of Auckland Castle in Bishop Auckland before work to turn the historic site into a tourist destination begins. It has revealed new information about the site's 900 year history.

Archaeologists have unearthed the remains of a building near the castle's Scotland Wing, alongside evidence of burning.

The castle's head curator, Dr Chris Ferguson, believes the volume of debris could suggest a 'very dramatic end' to what looks to have been a substantial structure.

"Sir Arthur Hazlerigg, was one of the five MPs who led the rebellion against Charles I in 1642, he was appointed Oliver Cromwell's general in the North East,"

"In 1650 he bought Auckland Castle after the then Bishop of Durham had fled at the height of the civil war.

"We know he set about what was later described as the 'ravenous sacrilege' of the building and that he proceeded to blow up the 350-year-old chapel with gunpowder with the intention of reusing the stone in a new mansion.

"If gunpowder was indeed used then that could account for the astounding amount of wreckage that has been found."

– The castle's head curator, Dr Chris Ferguson

"Whatever happened here is from a time when records were either vague or non-existent, so anything we find will help add to the overall picture of the castle."

– Natalie Swann, project archaeologist at Durham University

'English Civil War' artefacts unearthed at Auckland Castle

Artefacts from what's thought to be the English Civil war have been unearthed at Auckland Castle. Archaeologists from Durham University have been excavating the site which will be open to the public at the end of the month.

Discoveries on site

The Auckland Castle Trust hopes to uncover 900 years of history.

Hundreds of years of history

After 10 days of digging in Bishop Auckland, remains of a building have been laid bare in a trench on an area close to the castle's Scotland Wing.

Working at the excavation site

Auckland Castle's head curator, Dr Chris Ferguson, says the volume of debris is a 'puzzle and could suggest a very dramatic end' to what looks to be a substantial structure.

Bishop Auckland
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