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Man airlifted to hospital from Durham with neck injuries

A 21-year-old man has been airlifted to hospital from Durham with serious neck injuries.

Police were called to a house on Margery Lane in Durham City at about 9.30am to attend to the casualty.

He has been taken to James Cook hospital in Middlesbrough by air ambulance.

A cordon is in place at the property to allow for the police investigation.

At this stage police are not seeking anyone else in connection with the incident.

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People using A&E after eating too many easter eggs

People have been turning up at an A&E for treatment after eating too many easter eggs.

Residents of Teesside have been complaining to staff at the James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough that they have stomach ache and indigestion after over indulging.

South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust are urging people to go to pharmacies instead instead of A&E.

A post on the South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Facebook page is advising people to stay away from A&E and to rest and drink water.

Credit: Facebook

A previous post on the page urged people with minor injuries not to use A&E over the Easter weekend and warned "Don't waste Easter in A&E this weekend".

Julie Suckling, directorate manager of A&E said:

Minor complaints that reoccur should be dealt with by a GP and you should only attend for assessment if you have an acute [sudden and serious] complaint, that requires emergency care."

– Julie Suckling, directorate manager of A&E

The news comes after figures released in January revealed that over a third of attendances at A&E departments in England result in the person being sent home with just advice.

Of 19.6 million attendances in 2014/15 across England, more than a third (6.9 million) involved the person being given advice or guidance.

UK first: gamma camera installed at James Cook Hospital

Mark Richardson, head of nuclear medicine at South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, tests out the new Siemens ‘Symbia Evo’ camera at The James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough Credit: NHS South Tees

The first ‘Symbia Evo’ gamma camera in the country has been installed at The James Cook University Hospital. It is used by clinicians to see how the body is working.

The camera will be used to diagnose diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, Parkinson’s and dementia.

Based in the nuclear medicine department at the Middlesbrough hospital, the £250,000 kit will replace an existing camera, which is 13 years old.

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