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Three-parent babies could be born by 2015

The first three-parent babies could be born by 2015 after the government set out new draft regulations which will allow donor DNA from a second mother to be implanted into a defective egg.

A debate is being held in Westminster about the UK becoming the first country in the world to legalise babies with three biological parents. The controversial IVF technique has never been tried before.

Scientists in Newcastle are pushing for the technique to made legal. But critics say it's completely unethical and would be a step too far for the human race.

Helen Ford reports on one woman who lost seven children to genetic illness, and is in favour of the change:

Clashing opinions over three-parent IVF

A controversial technique that could see babies born to three biological parents is being debated at Westminster.

Scientists at Newcastle University want the IVF treatment to be legalised to prevent rare genetic illnesses. But critics say the procedure would be completely unethical.

Colin Hart at The Christian Institute and Professor Doug Turnbull at Newcastle University voice the arguments against and for the treatment:

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Scientists and religious groups clash over three-parent IVF

Scientists and religious groups have clashed over proposals for three-parent IVF, which are being debated in Westminster later today.

"If we're going to allow parents to chose what sort of genes their children have, that's a massive Rubicon and that's such a big Rubicon that in every other country this is not legal."

– Colin Hart, from The Christian Institute

"This research is about providing women who carry a specific sort of genetic disease reproductive choice. We already have ability for some genetic diseases to select on specific embryos."

– Professor Doug Turnbull, from Newcastle University, speaking to ITV News Tyne Tees

Newcastle scientists call for three-parent IVF

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Scientists at Newcastle university want the IVF treatment to be legalised to prevent rare genetic illnesses. Credit: ITV News Tyne Tees
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Critics say the procedure would be completely unethical. Credit: ITV News Tyne Tees

A controversial technique that could see babies born to three biological parents is being debated at Westminster later.

Scientists at Newcastle university want the IVF treatment to be legalised to prevent rare genetic illnesses. However, critics say the procedure would be completely unethical.

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