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Baccalaureate replaces GCSEs

The GCSE exam for 16-year-old children in England is to be replaced by an English Baccalaureate Certificate (EBacc), with the first courses to begin in September 2015, it was announced today.

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Teaching union chief says exam changes are 'entirely driven by political ideology'

Chris Keates, general secretary of the NASUWT teaching union, has said that Michael Gove has embarked on a "cynical and wholly unjustifiable" attempt to discredit GCSEs.

She added that today's proposals to replace GCSEs with an English Baccalaureate Certificate were "entirely driven by political ideology rather than a genuine desire on the part of the coalition Government to reform the examination system in the best interests of children and young people".

A further deep concern is the plight of those young people set to take GCSEs in the next two years.

They have now been told publicly that the exams for which they are working on are discredited and worthless.

The actions of the Secretary of State in this regard are unacceptable and the lack of concern for the impact and motivation of young people and teachers working towards GCSEs is disgraceful.

– Chris Keates, general secretary of NASUWT

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