Warning over level crossing risks

An advert showing the dangers of not paying attention at level crossings is being launched today. Network Rail has a £130m investment programme to improve level crossing safety.

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Types of level crossings for pedestrians

Level crossings take many forms depending on whether they are on a public or private road, or for vehicle, horse or pedestrian use.

The protection arrangements vary depending on the crossing location Credit: David Davies/PA Archive

Gated crossings operated by railway staff is protected by gates, on both sides of the railway, which complete the fencing of the railway when closed across the road or the railway.

Barrier crossings operated by railway staff is protected by road traffic light signals and lifting barriers on both sides of the railway.

Barrier crossings with obstacle detection is protected by road traffic light signals and lifting barriers on each side of the railway.

Automatic half barrier crossings is protected by road traffic light signals and a lifting barrier on both sides of the railway.

Automatic barrier crossings, locally monitored appears, to the road user, to be similar to an automatic half barrier crossing. It is protected by road traffic light signals and a single lifting barrier on both sides of the railway.

Open crossings does not have barriers or road traffic light signals. Only road traffic signs are provided. Road users must give way to trains at the crossing.

Footpath and bridleway crossings is found where the railway crosses a footpath or bridleway.

Foot crossings at stations is found between platforms at stations and may be the only route between platforms or the only practicable route for people who cannot use steps.

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