Hoodies still need to be hugged, justice campaigners say

David Cameron will later use his first major speech on crime since the coalition came to power in 2010 to distance himself from ever urging the public to "hug a hoodie".

Vicki Helyar-Cardwell, director of the Criminal Justice Alliance, praised the Tory leader's 2006 speech - from which the sometimes derided "hoodie phrase" emerged - for recognising that criminal and social justice were inextricably linked. But she said:

Several years on, the criminal justice system still often picks up the pieces when others have failed. The high levels of children in care who end up in our youth justice system are a telling example of this.

Looking ahead to the Prime Minister's speech, in which he will urge for a "tough, but intelligent" approach to justice, Ms Helyar-Cardwell warned of rising crime costs and said:

The danger is the intelligent bit gets lost at the expense of sounding tough. ... Making governors more accountable for what happens after prison is welcome, but this will backfire without efforts to curb huge prison overcrowding that blights much of the positive work in prisons.

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Cameron's fight back on crime

David Cameron tried to draw a line under the controversy surrounding his former Chief Whip with his first major speech on crime. The Prime Minister said he wants long sentences for the worst criminals and rehabilitation and education for others.