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Web porn block plans criticised

The Prime Minister's plans for family-friendly filters that block pornography for all new internet customers unless they opt out have been questioned by campaigners and some victims' relatives.

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PM's push for online porn block gets divided reaction

The head of the Child Exploitation & Online Protection Centre has backed David Cameron's drive for computers to carry an automatic block to stop internet searches for pornography.

What I think he is trying to do - and I support this - is cut off the easy supply of the indecent imagery of children at the point of first customer contact.

That won't stamp it out entirely but anything we can to do to make it more difficult will deter people from becoming offenders and also deter people from following on from that kind of offending into other kinds of harmful offending against children.

– Ceop ceo Peter Davies, speaking on BBC Radio 4's The World At One

But Padraig Reidy, of the Index on Censorship, said the family-friendly filters will be too restrictive.

If we have, as the Prime Minister is suggesting, an opt-out filter we have a kind of default censorship in place.

Families should be able to choose if they want to opt in to censorship. If a filter is set up as a default then it can really restrict what people can see legitimately.

Sites about sexual health, about sexuality and so on, will get caught up in the same filters as pornography. It will really restrict people's experience on the web, including children's.

– Padraig Reidy, speaking on BBC Radio 4's World At One

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