Manning prosecutors argue he acted with 'evil intent'

Prosecutors in the court martial of Bradley Manning have tried to prove he had a "general evil intent" and knew the classified material would be seen by al-Qaida.

  • Legal experts say an 'aiding the enemy' conviction could set a precedent as Manning did not give the material directly to al-Qaida.
  • In bringing the charge prosecutors cited the Civil War-era court martial of Henry Vanderwater, a Union soldier convicted in 1863 of the offence for giving a newspaper in Virginia a command roster that was then published
  • Prosecutors say he is a traitor who leaked information he had sworn to protect
  • They argued that Osama bin Laden had obtained some of the documents published by WikiLeaks before he was killed in 2011
  • WikiLeaks published the vast majority of the hundreds of thousands of documents leaked online, in many cases without omitting personal or logistically sensitive information

Read: Prosecutors say Manning 'dumped classified databases into hands of enemy'

More: Verdict due for Bradley Manning in WikiLeaks trial

Advertisement

Manning to be sentenced

US soldier Bradley Manning could face 136-year sentence later today after he was convicted of most of the 21 charges against him for leaking classified government files to WikiLeaks. He was acquitted of the most serious charge of aiding the enemy.