Survival rates of lung cancer 'very poor'

Less than a third of people diagnosed with lung cancer will survive the first year of the disease, a health chief has warned.

The director of health and wellbeing at Public Health England, Kevin Fenton, was speaking as part of Stoptober, a campaign to get smokers to quit for 28 days.

We are seeing worrying levels of smoking among women which is clearly having an impact on their health and reported cases of lung cancer. Smoking is one of the main causes of lung cancer, and survival rates are very poor. Less than a third of people diagnosed with lung cancer will survive the first year, and only 8% will still be alive five years later.

That is why it is important that people give Stoptober a go. If smokers can stop for 28-days they are five times more likely to be able remain smoke-free for good.

– Director of health and wellbeing at Public Health England Kevin Fenton

Advertisement

Female smokers urged to quit

The number of women diagnosed with lung cancer is "continuing" to rise, causing concerns about the number of female smokers, health chiefs have said. Experts at Public Health England have urged people to take part in Stoptober, to buck the trend.