Iraqi families drop unlawful killing claim against UK troops

The families of dead Iraqis who claimed they were unlawfully killed by British soldiers a decade ago have dropped their claims after admitting there was "insufficient evidence." But they intend to pursue their claims of mistreatment.

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Families drop claims of unlawful killings against troops

Claims that British troops unlawfully killed Iraqis a decade ago have been dropped by the families of the deceased who admitted there was "insufficient evidence."

Families have dropped claims that British soldiers unlawfully killed Iraqi civilians. Credit: Lewis Whyld/PA Archive

On the last full day of evidence at the year-long Al-Sweady Inquiry, Public Interest Lawyers, who are representing the families of the deceased, said there had been "insufficient evidence" to back their allegations that civilians were killed while in British troops' custody in May 2004.

PIL said it came to the decision after the end of military evidence and "the current state of disclosure by the Ministry of Defence".

The inquiry has heard evidence from hundreds of witnesses both here and abroad, at a cost of more than £22 million.

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