Violent crime fall linked to rise in alcohol prices

The number of people injured in serious violence dropped by 12% in 2013 compared to 2012. Credit: Alan Simpson/PA Archive

An increase in alcohol prices is partly responsible for a reduction in binge drinking and serious violence for the sixth consecutive year, a study has claimed.

The number of people injured in serious violence dropped by 12% in 2013 compared to 2012, with more than 32,000 fewer people treated for injuries relating to violence in England and Wales, a Cardiff University report found.

Professor Jonathan Shepherd, lead author of the study and director of the violence and society research group at the university, said a change in alcohol habits since 2008 could be one reason for the continued reduction.

He said: "Binge drinking has become less frequent, and the proportion of youths who don't drink alcohol at all has risen sharply. Also, after decades in which alcohol has become more affordable, since 2008 it has become less affordable.