NSPCC: 'We must recognise extreme emotional abuse'

Parliament must "recognise extreme emotional abuse" and give child protection services greater power by legislating against it, a senior member of the NSPCC said.

John Cameron, head of child protection operations, said the so-called "cinderella law" was not about punishing parents who did not buy their children "the latest gadgets or trainers":

The Government has indicated they are set to outlaw extreme emotional cruelty and this is a positive step forward and the publicity around this and highly publicised cases such as Daniel Pelka may have contributed to the sharp increase in calls.

We must recognise extreme emotional abuse for what it is - a crime - and those who carry it out should be prosecuted.

This isn't about prosecuting parents who don't buy their children the latest gadgets or trainers, this is about parents who consistently deny their children love and affection.

– John Cameron

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Emotional abuse cases 'up by nearly 50% in a year'

The number of children reported to the police and children's services by charity helplines has almost doubled in the space of year, the NSPCC has said. The children's charity's anonymous helpline assisted over 8,000 people last year.