Hacking trial was to 'explore culture of invading privacy'

Commenting after the phone hacking trial jury was discharged after failing to reach verdicts on two charges involving Andy Coulson, the CPS said the "lengthy and complex trial" was required to "explore a culture of invading privacy" and it has not yet decided whether to retry the outstanding counts.

Greg McGill, a senior lawyer for the Crown Prosecution Service said:

This case was not about whether phone hacking took place or whether public officials were paid for information; there are a significant number of recent convictions which show that both did happen.

This has been a lengthy and complex trial which was required to explore a culture of invading privacy. Despite a number of applications by the defence to have the case thrown out the Judge agreed that the evidence was sufficient for consideration by the jury.

The jury has found that Andy Coulson, former editor of a national newspaper, conspired with others to hack phones. Others who have admitted their role in this illegal practice - Greg Miskiw, Neville Thurlbeck, James Weatherup, Glenn Mulcaire and Dan Evans – all now face sentencing for phone hacking.

We respect the verdicts and will inform the court on Monday of our decision on whether to retry the outstanding counts.

As closely linked criminal proceedings are underway, I have nothing further to add at this time.

Read: Phone hacking trial in numbers

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Hacking jury discharged after failure to reach verdicts

The hacking trial jury has been discharged after failing to reach verdicts on two charges against former No 10 spin doctor Andy Coulson of conspiring to commit misconduct in a public office by paying police officers for two royal directories.