Daily Aspirin 'can significantly reduce risk of cancer'

People who take a daily dose of Aspirin could significantly reduce their risk of developing major cancers, a new study suggests.

Research found that if everyone in the UK aged 50 to 64 took aspirin for a decade an estimated 130,357 cancer deaths could be avoided over 20 years.

But medical professionals have warned that no-one should take the drug regularly without speaking to their GP first, because of the possible side effects.

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Aspirin one of 'most important things in cutting cancer'

A daily dose of aspirin "is the most important thing we can do to reduce cancer after stopping smoking and reducing obesity", a leading professor said.

Professor Jack Cuzick, head of the centre for cancer prevention at Queen Mary University, said he thought GPs should recommend the drug, adding:

It has long been known that aspirin - one of the cheapest and most common drugs on the market - can protect against certain types of cancer.

But until our study, where we analysed all the available evidence, it was unclear whether the pros of taking aspirin outweighed the cons.

Whilst there are some serious side effects that can't be ignored, taking aspirin daily looks to be the most important thing we can do to reduce cancer after stopping smoking and reducing obesity, and will probably be much easier to implement.

– Professor Jack Cuzick

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