Some police forces 'given up investigating' certain crimes

Some crimes are being ignored by some police forces because they have "given up investigating them", a watchdog has warned.

A report by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) found there was a "mindset" among some forces of doing "little or nothing more than recording a crime without taking further action".

The watchdog claimed offences such as criminal damage or vehicle crime are "on the verge of being decriminalised" as some forces have given up investigating them.

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17 police forces 'failed to identify vulnerable callers'

Some 17 police constabularies in England and Wales have such a disinterested mindset towards some crimes they "failed to identify vulnerable callers", a watchdog has found.

Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) found:

  • A total of 37 out of 43 forces in England and Wales used a system in which a call-handler assessed whether an officer should attend the scene of an incident.
  • But in some forces, call-handlers could not accurately describe what amounted to a risk or threat.
  • Attendance rates at crime scenes in the year to November 30 2013 varied widely between forces from 39% in Warwickshire to 100% in Cleveland.
  • This means that nearly two-thirds of crime scenes in Warwickshire were not attended by a police officer.
  • And in 17 forces, the Inspectorate found police community support officers (PCSOs) were being asked to investigate crimes beyond their role profile and training.

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