A tough day in office for new Welsh Secretary

David Jones MP
David jones faced tough questions and accusations in the House of Commons Photo: PA/ David Jones

There were so many warm welcomes for the new Welsh Secretary that he said he didn't know quite how to cope with them. But it was a good job that David Jones didn't get too used to the kind words because the criticism flowed soon enough.

Since being appointed to David Cameron's cabinet last month, David Jones has frequently said that he wants a fresh start in the relationship between the Welsh Government of Carwyn Jones and the UK Government, particularly the Wales Office.

He reiterated that intention again today, saying that he's 'committed to the respect agenda' between the two governments and that he's 'pleased' with the way the relationship is developing between him and the First Minister.

There's much less sign of that though in the relationship with his Labour Shadow. Owen Smith used his questions to portray Mr Jones as anti-devolution:

Some potentially significant snippets of information emerged from the session.

In response to a question from Plaid's Hywel Williams, the Welsh Secretary said he was already talking to the Welsh Government and the UK Transport Secretary about exploring the possibility of electrifying the main rail line across North Wales.

And, asked about reports that the Severn Bridges tolls would continue long after the contract ends with the private companies running them, the Wales Office minister Stephen Crabb said 'no decision has been made.'

There was a strong Welsh flavour to Prime Minister's Questions too with a string of Welsh MPs taking their turn to quiz or criticise David Cameron.

Those exchanges ranged from the sombre to the angry. Sombreness came when the Prime Minister joined tributes to Dyfed-Powys police and the community of Machynlleth for its response to the case of April Jones.

Meanwhile the angriness flared in this exchange with Rhondda MP Chris Bryant: