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Woman dies in Snowdonia

A 70-year-old woman has died on the 3,000ft Tryfan in Snowdonia

Rescuers were alerted when her partner arrived at a car park in the Ogwen Valley, yesterday, in a confused state with superficial injuries.

Members of Ogwen mountain rescue team went on the mountain and discovered the woman lying on a footpath to the east of the Milestone Buttress, having fallen more than 30ft. A dozen team members helped to recover the body last night.

The woman had been with an eight-strong family party from the Midlands and South of England, their ages ranging from late 30s to mid 70s, who had walked up Tryfan, arriving at the foot of the North Tower about lunchtime. One of the senior couple was not confident about climbing the Tower, so the party split, four continuing to the summit and the couple retracting their steps down the north ridge and following the line of a footpath.

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New analysis shows extent of attacks on sheep

Credit: David Jones/PA Archive/PA Images

North Wales Police say they are using specially collated data to tackle the problem of dog attacks on sheep.

The North Wales Police Rural Crime Team shows the true extent of attacks which they say is an under reported national issue.

The analysis shows that in the last 12 months there were 108 separate incidents recorded, with most involving more than one sheep.

The county with the highest incidents is Gwynedd with 27 recorded, nearly three times that of the Wrexham County, with 10.

The average number of attacks is nine a month. In one incident more than 30 sheep were attacked by a Rottweiler in Buckley.

The statistics also reveal that Friday is the day of the week when most attacks occur, substantially more than on a Monday, but it unclear why this is the case.

As a team we needed to decide what the real issues are with rural crime and we have achieved this by recording accurate daily statistics for all manner of incidents.

This has led to significant drops in all rural incidents in North Wales, including sheep attacks. We have found that the only answer with such attacks is to take a zero tolerance approach with irresponsible dog owners.

This has led to court cases and heavy fines.

– Sgt Rob Taylor, Rural Crime Team

Wales 'ideal to trial driverless car use'

Credit: Rui Vieira/PA Wire

A group of academics says driverless cars could provide the answer to poor public transport links in rural areas of Wales and the nation’s country roads are an ideal place to pioneer their use.

Engineers at Glyndwr University believe that, subject to local consultation, opportunities to trial use of the revolutionary vehicles should be prioritised in Wales.

They say driverless cars have the potential to be used effectively on the steep, narrow, slow and sinuous roads of Wales.

They believe the vehicles have the potential to significantly improve the quality of life in rural areas, in essence being used as taxis.

Driverless car being tested. Credit: Rui Vieira/PA Wire

We believe that driverless cars have real potential to deliver a sustainable rural economy for Wales.

There is a decline in rural populations as more and more young people head into the city to find work and the offset of this has been that public transport links have become even more infrequent – and non-existent in some areas.

I think we’re looking at five to ten years before something like this could become a reality and it would of course need the consent of people living in rural areas, with all of their concerns addressed.

– Barry Johnston, Glyndwr University’s engineering department

The academics have submitted their views to the Welsh Government to help inform its Transport Strategy for Wales.

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