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More protection for island habitats welcomed

Skomer is home to puffins and other species. Credit: Suzy Harrison/PA Images

RSPB Cymru is welcoming more protection for habitats at three key sites for seabirds.

The sites are RSPB Grassholm, The Wildlife Trusts of South and West Wales islands of Skomer and Skokholm and Bardsey Island, which is managed by the Bardsey Island Trust.

The move, announced by the Welsh Government means that between 2 – 9 km of the seas around the islands are now protected by law.

Skomer is described as a photgrapher's paradise. Credit: David Jones/PA Archive/PA Images

The Society says the sites will contribute to the network of protected special sites helping seabird colonies to be healthier and more resilient to other issues like the effects of climate change.

The seas around islands like these are so important for our seabirds as these are where the birds socialise. Birds like gannets, Manx shearwaters and puffins, will use areas like this for preening, bathing and displaying.

– Gareth Cunningham RSPB Cymru Marine Policy Officer

Water released to help migrating fish

The water release will last for five days. Credit: David Cheskin/PA Wire

Natural Resources Wales (NRW) says it's taking steps to encourage salmon and sewin (sea trout) to reach their spawning grounds and improve stocks.

It says the dry September weather has been a welcome treat for most but for Wales’ fish populations the lack of rain is hindering their annual migration.

To combat this, NRW has worked with Dwr Cymru Welsh Water to release water from reservoirs into the rivers Tywi and Cleddau to encourage adult salmon and sewin to enter the rivers from Carmarthen Bay.

“The River Tywi and its population of salmon and sea trout is worth an estimated £10.2 million to the Welsh economy and the release will benefit anglers as well as boost fish numbers.........

The release of additional water from the reservoirs will not affect the public water supply and people who use the river have been alerted to take care as the flow will increase to four times its current level.

– Dave Mee, Fisheries Team Leader for NRW

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Calls for law to 'protect' countryside from off-roaders

A campaign's been launched calling for new laws to help protect the wild uplands of north east Wales from off-roading.

The Llangollen-based 'Save Our Paths' group says the number of off-roaders coming to the region is growing, with paths and countryside being damaged.

Ian Lang reports.

Phone app helps find lost walkers in Snowdonia

A smartphone app was used to find a man and woman who got lost in poor visibility and then darkness high on a Snowdonia peak.

At 7.30pm on Saturday night, Aberdyfi search and rescue team were alerted to two lost walkers, in their 20s and from Birmingham, on Cadair Idris, near Dolgellau. One had an injured knee.

A small party of mountain rescuers made their way directly to the location after their mobile phone position was pinpointed. The pair were escorted down the mountain to Gwernan lake, which rescuers said was a slow process because of the tussock and gorse-covered hillside, and everyone was off the near-3,000ft peak by 11pm.

Man airlifted after fall in Snowdonia

Mountain Rescue says the party was well equipped. Credit: Rob Formstone/PA Archive/PA Images

A 45-year-old man from Newtown in Mid Wales was flown to hospital with cuts to his head and lower leg injuries, last night, after he fell 20 feet while scrambling in Snowdonia.

It happened on the north ridge of 3,000ft high Tryfan and he was winched aboard an RAF rescue helicopter based at Valley in Anglesey and flown to hospital at Bangor.

Ogwen Valley Mountain Rescue Team was also involved, sending a party of twelve on to the mountain equipped with a stretcher and ropes.

The man had been with a group of four from Newtown when a rock he was grasping became dislodged.

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Dog ban for North Wales fox hunter

A man from North Wales has been handed a suspended sentence after admitting to using his dog for fox hunting.

RSPCA found the dog named Celt with scratches to its face Credit: RSPCA

William Clive Alun Jones, 26, was sentenced at Caernarfon Magistrates’ Court.

A joint operation by the RSPCA and North Wales Police found him using his bull lurcher for hunting and fighting other animals.

He was given a 30 day custodial sentence which was suspended for 12 months and has been banned from keeping dogs for eight years.

  1. Fiona Scott

Gleision: The Mine Owners' Story

Rescue workers at the Gleision Colliery, 2011 Credit: PA / PA Wire / Press Association Images

Seven years ago, coal haulier Gerald Ward took over a mine in the Swansea Valley. Little did he realise that the Gleision would eventually see him at the centre of worldwide media attention.

Gerald and his sister Maria Seage are partners in MNS Mining, the company found not guilty of gross negligence manslaughter following the deaths of four miners who died at the Gleision three years ago today.

Gerald and Maria have maintained a dignified silence throughout those three years, but tonight they talk exclusively to ITV Wales about their battle to get the mine up and running and the disastrous events of September 15th 2011.

Maria Seage, MNS Mining Credit: ITV News Cymru Wales

Maria says the loss of four men down a mine she owns haunts her constantly.

Honestly it's a struggle everyday, it's a struggle getting through the day.

– Maria Seage, MNS Mining

Gerald explains that when one of the colliers on that day ran to the surface shouting there was water everywhere, everything was flooded, he went down on his knees and prayed.

Gerald Ward, MNS Mining Credit: ITV News Cymru Wales

We was all there one minute and then four of the boys have gone... it was devastating.

– Gerald Ward, MNS Mining

Tonight, in the first of two programmes revealing the inside story of Gleision - the convicted conman who promised to invest in the mine, the coal haulier who found himself out of his depth and the big sister who came to the rescue, spending a small fortune on a pit which ultimately claimed the lives of four local men.

Wales This Week, Gleision - The Inside Story. Tonight at 8pm, ITV Wales

Coast & Country visits Cardigan and Pembrokeshire

Credit: ITV News Cymru Wales

This week on Coast and Country, Andrew is in Cardigan getting to grips with an ancient fishing technique.

Known as Seine net fishing, it was introduced to the area by monks early in the 12th century. Aaron Walters, a local fisherman, is keeping the tradition going and shows Andrew how it's done.

Andrew then meets Jade Mellor, a local forager, to collect wild food along the coastline and hedgerows, before cooking for Aaron and his fellow fishermen on the beautiful beach of Poppit Sands.

Ruth is helping family company Blaenavon Cheddar to prepare their Pwll Mawr cheese. She will also be visiting one of Wales's iconic manor houses where another of their cheeses is left to mature.

And this week we also have a guest presenter - Rob Shelley gets a little hot under the collar in North Wales as he learns about the steam history surrounding Porthmadog.

Don’t miss the final show of our summer series this Friday, August 29th, at 8.00pm on ITV Cymru Wales.

Credit: ITV News Cymru Wales
Credit: ITV News Cymru Wales
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