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New wave energy scheme for Pembrokeshire

The site of the scheme has not yet been revealed. Credit: Mike Fuhrmann/The Canadian Press/PA Images

A £5.8m scheme to generate energy from sea waves off the Pembrokeshire coast has been announced.

Wave-tricity will develop and test a new device called the Ocean Wave Rower backed by EU funding.

The Welsh Government says the project is the latest investment to help create a world-leading marine energy sector in Wales.

£12m has been committed to clean energy projects including Minesto’s Deep Green initiative, being developed in Anglesey, and Marine Power Solutions’ WaveSub technology which will also be deployed in Pembrokeshire waters.

Marine energy is an important sector and Wales has excellent natural resources which can be harnessed. I am delighted this investment will bring another significant energy project to Pembrokeshire.

It’s very encouraging that this scheme, which has such potential is being developed in Wales, particularly as it will lead to good employment and business opportunities in the local area.

– Mark Drakeford AM, Finance Secretary

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Largest ever study reveals globally protected areas benefit broad range of species

Credit: University of Sussex

Swansea University scientists have been involved in a collaborative study which reveals for the first time that the world’s protected areas do benefit a broad range of species

The study, published in Nature Communications, led by the University of Sussex working together with the Natural History Museum, the UNEP - World Conservation Monitoring Centre and Swansea University, is the largest ever analysis of globally protected areas.

By analysing biodiversity samples taken from 1,939 sites inside and 4,592 sites outside 359 protected areas, scientists have discovered the protected area samples contain 15 percent more individuals and 11 percent more species compared to samples from unprotected sites.

Protected areas are considered a quintessential measure for biodiversity conservation and many nations have committed to increase them to cover at least 17% of the terrestrial area (‘Aichi biodiversity targets’ of the Convention on Biological Diversity). It was hence timely to carry out a comprehensive global evaluation of the effectiveness of protected areas.

– Associate Professor Luca Börger , Swansea University
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