Wales' midwife shortage

A report by the Royal College of Midwives has found there's a shortage of midwives in Wales, with fewer in going into training than previous years.

Welsh Government responds to midwifery report

Decisions about training places are based on what the NHS needs to maintain services, service development, the numbers and age profile of staff and the drop-out rate from the courses.

Clearly plans also take into account the student midwives who are already in training and when these are expected to graduate and enter the workforce.

NHS organisations are responsible for ensuring that they have the appropriate number of staff and skill mix to meet fluctuating demand.

Since 1999, the maternity workforce, including midwives and midwifery support workers, has increased by 12% in Wales.

We require all maternity units in Wales to comply with Birth Rate Plus - as recommended by the Royal College of Midwives - on the number of midwives required to deliver safe services.

– Welsh Government Spokesperson

Midwife shortage: "We need more midwives"

A report by the Royal College of Midwives revealed a shortage of midwives in Wales.

It found that between 2001 and 2011 the number of babies born in Wales increased by just under 5,000. In comparison, the number of full time midwives rose by just 35.

To put it simply we need more midwives. We also need to at least sustain the proposed increase in the number of midwives in training in years to come. Any further cuts in numbers will adversely affect the quality of maternity care that women receive.

– Helen Rogers, Royal College of Midwives Director for Wales

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'Concern' over Wales midwife shortage

The number of midwives in training in Wales has fallen over the past year by 10 places Credit: David Jones / PA Wire

There is a shortage of midwives in Wales, according to research by the Royal College of Midwives.

Figures from the latest annual State of Maternity report show that the number of midwives in training in Wales fell over the past year by 10 places to 249.

Despite a slow-down in the Welsh birthrate, the number of babies born in 2011 was still 16% higher than in 2001.

The Royal College of Midwives says the shortage of midwives in the country is "causing concern".