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Patient wouldn't have had surgery 'if he had known what he was going into'

The partner of Allan King, who died after receiving bowel surgery at the Princess of Wales Hospital in Bridgend, says she felt the hospital treated them as 'a hinderance.'

Dorothy Wilson told ITV News that she feels that Allan "wouldn't have entered into surgery if he had known what he was going into."

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Health Board 'accepts recommendations'

We would like to take this opportunity to once again express our sincere condolences the family and friends of Mr Harris.

The Health Board fully accepts the recommendations of the Ombudsman and would like to take this opportunity to apologise to his partner publicly for our failings.

The safety and quality of care of all our patients is very important and the consent process is a crucial part of this. Although these tragic events involve one individual patient and one clinical team we recognise that it is something we can all learn from.

– Spokesperson for Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board

Health board fined following report

Abertawe Bro Morgannwg Health Board has been criticised for its care of a man with a bowel complaint who then died after surgery.

A report from the Public Services Ombudsman found that he was not properly informed about the risks of the surgery and the operation was a complex procedure at the limits of the surgeon's skill.

The ombudsman also found that the man's partner should have been informed about his deterioration sooner. The health board have been ordered to pay £5,000 in compensation.

38 hospitalised in Swansea measles outbreak

Public Health Wales say that the number of cases of measles in the Swansea area has reached 252.

Within the past week, 43 new cases have been reported.

The disease has now spread to children in 64 secondary and primary schools and nurseries across the area, with numbers of new cases doubling weekly.

The majority of the new cases are in the Swansea area, but cases are being reported across South East Wales.

The continuing spread of the disease in the Swansea area means that it is only a matter of time before we have a child whose health is seriously damaged by measles.

We are urging parents of unvaccinated children to make immediate arrangements with their GP for their children to receive the safe and highly effective MMR vaccine.

– Dr Marion Lyons, Director of Health Protection for Public Health Wales

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Twenty more measles cases in Swansea outbreak

Twenty new cases of measles have been reported as the outbreak in the Swansea area continues.

Public Health Wales is continuing to urge parents to ensure their children receive the MMR vaccination as it investigates the new cases in the Swansea and Neath Port Talbot area.

The new cases bring the total number of cases to 209. The majority of the latest infections are in the Swansea area.

Dr Marion Lyons, Director of Health Protection for Public Health Wales, said that "measles is a very contagious disease."

All children who have not been fully immunised face a life-long risk of catching measles.

Most people make a full recovery but there is a rare possibility of severe complications including serious eye disorders, deafness, brain damage and even death.

Measles can be prevented by use of the safe and highly effective measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine.

Parents can easily protect their children by having them immunised with the MMR vaccine. After completing a two-dose course of MMR, 99 per cent of children will be protected against measles.

– Dr Marion Lyons, Director of Health Protection for Public Health Wales

Parents of all children aged between one and 18 who have not been fully vaccinated are being advised to contact their GP for advice and to get their child vaccinated as soon as possible.

Health chiefs: Measles outbreak 'potentially fatal'

The director of health protection for Public Health Wales says she fears 'it is only a matter of time' before someone dies as a result of the latest measles outbreak.

We cannot emphasise enough that measles is an illness that can kill, or leave patients with permanent complications including severe brain damage.

As children have been admitted to hospital because of this outbreak of measles we fear it is only a matter of time before someone dies or is left permanently affected by measles.

– Dr Marion Lyons, Public Health Wales

Public Health Wales is urging parents to ensure their children are fully vaccinated against measles, saying it is 'the only effective way' of protecting against the illness.

It added that it is working closely with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board to combat the outbreak.

Measles: What are the symptoms?

Almost 200 cases of measles have been diagnosed in the Swansea and Neath Port Talbot areas since November, with 20 cases identified in the last week alone.

Symptoms can include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Red eyes
  • Blocked nose
  • Blotchy rash beginning on the face and spreading downwards to the rest of the body over several days

Typically people will be infectious from the day before their first symptoms until four to five days after the appearance of the rash.

Source: Public Health Wales

Public Health Wales 'concerned' at measles outbreak

Public Health Wales is urging parents to ensure their children are vaccinated against measles Credit: Owen Humphreys/PA Wire

Health chiefs say they 'continue to be concerned' at the number of cases of measles in the Swansea and Neath Port Talbot areas.

Nearly 200 people have been diagnosed since the outbreak started in November, with 20 new cases in the last week alone.

More than 30 schools and nurseries have been affected so far.

Public Health Wales says it is working closely with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board to combat the outbreak.

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