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Cardiff University leads new global Alzheimer's research

Scientists from Cardiff University are leading new global research into Alzheimer's disease, in a study involving more than one million people around the world.

The £6m project will look into the relationship between genetics and lifestyle in the development of Alzheimer's, hoping to produce the most comprehensive understanding of the disease's risk to date.

Cardiff University's Professor Julie Williams is leading the global research.

"For too long scientists studying Alzheimer's have been working in silos, engaged in a single-minded 'race' to try and beat the disease. That's simply not going to happen unless we pull together," said Principal Investigator Prof Julie Williams from Cardiff University.

"The insights gleaned will pave the way for a new era of therapies. We predict that in future, based on this unrivalled data, GPs may be able run a simple test to analyse a patient's risk of developing Alzheimer's."

"A combination of gene therapy, drugs and lifestyle changes could then be prescribed to reduce that risk."

The research will look at the genetic data of more than a million people over the age of 65, from Europe, America, Australia and Asia.

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Cardiff medical students to train in the community

The new programme at Cardiff will mean students working in the community. Credit: ITV News

Cardiff has unveiled a new approach to training and retaining doctors in Wales.

Marking the biggest transformation of Cardiff University's medical education programme since its School of Medicine was founded in 1921 the new curriculum aims to cultivate world-class doctors by introducing more community centred learning.

Studies show that medical students who train in underserved areas are more likely to return there to work after graduation.

Professor John Bligh, Dean of Cardiff University's School of Medicine said:

One students learns how to take a blood sample. Credit: ITV News

"Ultimately our goal is to modernise teaching with a view to producing world-class clinicians who want to live and work in Wales for the benefit of Welsh patients, and we hope the community-centred learning experience that this curriculum offers will encourage this."

Under the new curriculum, students will be introduced to community-based learning in their first year to ensure early patient contact. Cardiff University School of Medicine is responsible for the graduation of 300 student doctors annually.

New curriculum to change doctor training in Wales

A new education programme launched by Cardiff University's School of Medicine aims to transform the way doctors are trained and produce more doctors 'who want to live and work in Wales'.

The new curriculum is an important milestone for medical education in Wales and will play a critical role in ensuring the future health of Wales.

Not only will it encourage students to be independent, life-long learners with a strong focus on science within clinical practice, but it will also instil at the heart of their learning, a renewed patient consciousness.

Ultimately, our goal is to modernise teaching with a view to producing world-class clinicians who want to live and work in Wales for the benefit of Welsh patients, and we hope the community-centred learning experience that this curriculum offers will encourage this.

– Professor John Bligh, Dean of Cardiff University's School of Medicine

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Education programme to train and keep doctors in Wales

The new programme aims to produce first-rate patients care and change the way doctors are trained. Credit: PA

Wales' largest medical school has unveiled a new education programme designed to attract, train and retain the best doctors for the country.

Cardiff University's School of Medicine will launch a new undergraduate patient-focused curriculum to transform the way doctors are trained.

Under the new curriculum, aspiring doctors will visit patients at home and learn about clinical consulting from GP tutors in their surgeries.

Scientists develop drug to stop breast cancer spread

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Cardiff scientists are developing a drug to tackle metastatic tumours Credit: ITV Cymru Wales

Scientists at Cardiff University have developed an experimental compound that can reduce the spread of breast cancer by more than eighty percent.

Up to 12,000 women a year develop these additional tumours.

This new approach of tackling the disease through drugs is in the pre clinical phase. Researchers are now working to prepare the drug for patient trials in the next 18 months.

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