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Worm-infected kidneys could not have been 'forseen'

The inquest into the deaths of two transplant patients has heard that the viruses and conditions the donor and his organ had been tested for included hepatitis, HIV, dengue fever and herpes - all of which proved negative.

UHW consultant surgeon Argiris Asderakis said pre-operation checks on the donor kidneys and the recipients gave him no cause for concern.

When Mr Asderakis was asked whether he or other doctors would have been expected to check for halcephalobus - a parasitic worm-, he replied:

"No, not at all. I had never even heard of it before.

"Nobody could have predicted what ended up being the first human to human transmission of this bug.

"Could I have foreseen it? No.

"I know this is no consolation to the families."

He also insisted that, given what he knew at the time, he considered the organs to be of "low risk".

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Transplant patient 'aware of donor's meningitis'

A surgeon has told an inquest that one of two patients who died after receiving a kidney transplant was aware of the donor's suspected viral meningitis.

Robert Stuart, known as Jim to his family, was advised of possible kidney dysfunction, Argiris Asderakis told the hearing at Cardiff Coroner's Court

The 67-year-old, from Cardiff and 42-year-old Darren Hughes, 42, of Bridgend, both died after receiving a kidney from the same donor at University Hospital of Wales in Cardiff in December 2013.

The inquest has heard that doctors knew the donor had died from meningitis before accepting the organs.

  1. National

Surgeon accepted donor's kidneys despite meningitis

A surgeon has explained to an inquest why he was content to receive kidneys for two men from an alcoholic donor who had died from meningitis.

Argiris Asderakis, Consultant Transplant Surgeon at University Hospital of South Wales, told the hearing he was initially told the donor died from meningoencephalitis - a medical condition that resembles meningitis and brain infection encephalitis.

Giving evidence at Cardiff Coroner's Court, Asderakis said he believed that the threat of a virus in the organs, which had been rejected by several hospitals, was "most likely" covered by the treatment the donor had been receiving.

Robert Stuart, 67, from Cardiff, and Darren Hughes, 42, of Bridgend, both died after being given kidneys from an alcoholic donor infected with the deadly parasitic worm halcephalobus.

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Inquest resumes into kidney transplant patient deaths

An inquest has resumed into the case of two transplant patients who died after receiving kidneys that turned out to carry a deadly parasitic worm from the same alcoholic donor that other hospitals turned down.

Cardiff Coroner's Court heard the organs implanted in Darren Hughes and Robert 'Jim' Stuart had been rejected by several other hospitals before they were eventually used at the University Hospital of South Wales.

The court has been told post-mortem tests were not carried out on the 39-year-old organ donor - who doctors said had died from a suspected viral infection.

ITV News Correspondent Rupert Evelyn reports from the second day of the hearing.

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Inquest resumes over kidney transplant patient deaths

An inquest is set to continue later after earlier hearing that two transplant patients died after receiving kidneys from the same alcoholic donor other hospitals turned down.

Inquest resumes over kidney transplant patient deaths. Credit: ITV News

Robert Stuart, 67, from Cardiff, and Darren Hughes, 42, from Bridgend, underwent transplants at the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, last year.

The pair died days apart and lab tests later showed they had been infected with the deadly parasitic worm halcephalobus, which a pathologist believes came from their organ donor.

Cardiff Coroner's Court was told a post-mortem had not been carried out on the 39-year-old organ donor from Manchester - who doctors said had died from a suspected viral infection.

  1. National

Seven hospitals 'rejected worm-infected kidneys'

Seven hospitals rejected kidneys from an alcoholic donor before they were transplanted into two men who died shortly after, an inquest heard today.

A pathologist told a hearing in Cardiff that Robert Stuart, 67, and Darren Hughes, 42, had been infected with deadly parasitic worm halcephalobus.

Histopathologist Dr Fauod Alchami said on the "balance of probabilities", the parasitic worms found in the men came via their donated kidney.

The coroner's court was told no post-mortem had been carried out on the 39-year-old donor after his death from what was believed at the time to be a viral infection.

The inquest heard question marks over the man's death prompted seven hospitals to say no to his organs, but UHW specialist transplant nurse Dawn Chapman said this only came to light after the men's deaths.

She said changes had since been made where surgeons can find out whether organs they may use for transplants have been turned down by other hospitals.

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