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Study could mean scallop fishing resumes in Cardigan Bay

Credit: ITV Wales

Scientists at Bangor University, working with the Welsh Fishermen's Association Natural Resources Wales and the Welsh Government, have published their findings from what they say is the world's biggest ever fishing impact study.

They chose twelve sites in Cardigan Bay where scallop fishing was halted in 2009.

The sites were fished at different intensities and compared to four areas which were left unfished. The results suggest the area can sustain a certain level of fishing.

The study could open the door for fishing to resume once a sustainable level is decided.

Dolphins return to Cardigan Bay for summer

Marine charity Sea Watch Foundation says sightings of bottlenose dolphins in Ceredigion will increase 'week on week', as they return to the shelter of the area to protect their young.

Male and female bottlenose dolphins can live for more than 25 years Credit: Sea Watch Foundation

Cardigan Bay is famous for hosting one of Europe's largest semi-resident populations of bottlenose dolphins, one of the area's most important economic assets.

This winter also saw a more unusual visitor, in the shape of the short-beaked common dolphin. This type of species is usually seen in deeper waters such as in nearby Pembrokeshire.

Since it was first recorded, the charity has continued to receive reports from other local observers.

The common dolphin has been spotted in New Quay harbour numerous times Credit: Sea Watch Foundation/Ken Pilkinton

What will the common dolphin do when the bottlenose dolphins return, people ask me. The truth is we can't be sure! We would love to see this elegant and unusual New Quay resident spend its life in the bay, but there are high expectations that its larger cousins will not tolerate its presence. We'll have to wait and see.

– Kathy James, Sightings Officer, Sea Watch Foundation

Sea Watch Foundation monitors whales, dolphins and porpoises all over the UK.

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