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Red Cross to run NHS summer service in Tenby

The Red Cross will aim to take over the services of the Minor Injuries Unit at Tenby over summer weekends. Credit: Visit Wales

The Red Cross is to run weekend first aid services in Tenby over the summer months if and when the minor injuries unit is closed.

Hywel Dda Health Board says the move - which is being piloted - will allow emergency nurses to be redeployed at A&E services at Withybush Hospital in Haverfordwest.

The service will run by The British Red Cross between July and September from Tenby Hospital over each weekend and during the August bank holiday.

The pilot will run alongside the minor injury service for the first few weeks to allow the health board to evaluate its impact.

Sue Lewis, County Director for Pembrokeshire said, “Having the Red Cross provide this service reflects the health board’s partnership approach to working with the third sector in more innovative ways."

Nigel Davies, senior services manager for the Red Cross, said, “We are delighted to have been asked to pilot this new service. It will be run by a group of skilled individuals."

Health Board criticised for surgery 'at limit of doctor's ability'

Abertawe Bro Morgannwg Health Board has been criticised for its care of a man with a bowel complaint who then died after surgery.

A report from the Public Services Ombudsman found that he was not properly informed about the risks of the surgery and the operation was a complex procedure at the limits of the surgeon's skill.

Allan King's partner Dorothy Dorothy Wilson told ITV News' Rob Osborne that she feels that Allan "wouldn't have entered into surgery if he had known what he was going into."

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Patient wouldn't have had surgery 'if he had known what he was going into'

The partner of Allan King, who died after receiving bowel surgery at the Princess of Wales Hospital in Bridgend, says she felt the hospital treated them as 'a hinderance.'

Dorothy Wilson told ITV News that she feels that Allan "wouldn't have entered into surgery if he had known what he was going into."

Health Board 'accepts recommendations'

We would like to take this opportunity to once again express our sincere condolences the family and friends of Mr Harris.

The Health Board fully accepts the recommendations of the Ombudsman and would like to take this opportunity to apologise to his partner publicly for our failings.

The safety and quality of care of all our patients is very important and the consent process is a crucial part of this. Although these tragic events involve one individual patient and one clinical team we recognise that it is something we can all learn from.

– Spokesperson for Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board

Health board fined following report

Abertawe Bro Morgannwg Health Board has been criticised for its care of a man with a bowel complaint who then died after surgery.

A report from the Public Services Ombudsman found that he was not properly informed about the risks of the surgery and the operation was a complex procedure at the limits of the surgeon's skill.

The ombudsman also found that the man's partner should have been informed about his deterioration sooner. The health board have been ordered to pay £5,000 in compensation.

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Betsi Cadwaladr: 'Modern' services needed to treat ageing population

Dr Matthew Makin, from Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board, says the proposed reforms are needed in order to meet future needs.

"In North Wales we're seeing a rise in the population of elderly people with chronic health problems" he says.

"We're going to see the population of 85 year olds double, and what we've got to make sure of is that we have a health service that is modern and designed to meet the needs of those patients."

Neo-natal care support group opposes plans to base unit in England

John Hewitt is part of Cuddles (Care Understanding Devotion to Duty for the Lives of the Extremely Small) , a volunteer-run support group for parents and babies associated with the Special Care Unit at Ysbyty Glan Clwyd .

The group is concerned at proposals to close the unit and treat babies more than 16 weeks premature at a single intensive care neonatal service at Arrowe Park, on the Wirral. It fears relatives would have too far to travel.

"I think it would have a devastating effect on the parents of the babies... obviously at their most vulnerable time." he says.

" When a baby is born into the Special Care Baby Unit, there's already a tremendous pressure on the parent. The vulnerability of the child should be taken into account".

A report commissioned by Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board was published last month, and found the number of babies requiring this level of care amounted to 36 in 7,300 births in the region each year.