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Grant to make Llancaiach Fawr Manor 'accessible to all'

Llancaiach Fawr employees say a £943,200 grant awarded to the manor will be used to help tell 'a complete story of the all the people who lived and worked there' and make the site accessible for all visitors.

With the support of the Heritage Lottery Fund, not only will we will be able to show the difference between the living conditions of the servants, as well as the gentry owners, for the first time, but we will also be able to open up the vast majority of the building to visitors with mobility difficulties who have formerly only been able to access the ground floor.

– Diane Walker, General Manager of Llancaiach Fawr Manor

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Llancaiach Fawr aims for 80,000 annual visitors by 2020

Llancaiach Fawr, which was built in 1550 by the Prichard family, is considered to be one of the most important Gentry houses to have survived from the 16th and 17th century period.

Its £943,200 Heritage Lottery Fund grant will help fund:

  • Restoration of a stone roof, removal of inappropriate modern features and repair and opening of the attic
  • Installation of an external staircase tower and platform lift to allow wheelchair users access to the upper floors
  • Conservation work on the manor

It will also help:

  • Improve physical and sensory interpretation, including open fires, sound and lighting, to create an atmosphere of 17th Century domestic life
  • Involve young people in learning about their local history
  • Pay for a Development and Outreach Officer, who will manage community activities

Llancaiach Fawr says it hopes to attract 80,000 annual visitors by 2020 as a result of the improvements.

Llancaiach Fawr Manor's hidden attic to be revealed

Llancaiach Fawr was built in 1550 by the Prichard family Credit: Llancaiach Fawr Manor

Llancaiach Fawr Manor has been awarded a £943,200 grant, which will see its hidden attic - a former servants' quarters - opened up to the public for the very first time.

The Grade I listed Tudor mansion in Nelson, near Caerphilly, is restored and furnished as it would have been in 1645. The money will be used to improve and conserve the attraction, and also provide better access for wheelchair users.

Cllr Ken James at Caerphilly County Borough Council said the Heritage Lottery funding 'would help transform the way the past is presented to a modern audience'.

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