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Health Board criticised for surgery 'at limit of doctor's ability'

Abertawe Bro Morgannwg Health Board has been criticised for its care of a man with a bowel complaint who then died after surgery.

A report from the Public Services Ombudsman found that he was not properly informed about the risks of the surgery and the operation was a complex procedure at the limits of the surgeon's skill.

Allan King's partner Dorothy Dorothy Wilson told ITV News' Rob Osborne that she feels that Allan "wouldn't have entered into surgery if he had known what he was going into."

Patient wouldn't have had surgery 'if he had known what he was going into'

The partner of Allan King, who died after receiving bowel surgery at the Princess of Wales Hospital in Bridgend, says she felt the hospital treated them as 'a hinderance.'

Dorothy Wilson told ITV News that she feels that Allan "wouldn't have entered into surgery if he had known what he was going into."

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Health Board 'accepts recommendations'

We would like to take this opportunity to once again express our sincere condolences the family and friends of Mr Harris.

The Health Board fully accepts the recommendations of the Ombudsman and would like to take this opportunity to apologise to his partner publicly for our failings.

The safety and quality of care of all our patients is very important and the consent process is a crucial part of this. Although these tragic events involve one individual patient and one clinical team we recognise that it is something we can all learn from.

– Spokesperson for Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board

Health board fined following report

Abertawe Bro Morgannwg Health Board has been criticised for its care of a man with a bowel complaint who then died after surgery.

A report from the Public Services Ombudsman found that he was not properly informed about the risks of the surgery and the operation was a complex procedure at the limits of the surgeon's skill.

The ombudsman also found that the man's partner should have been informed about his deterioration sooner. The health board have been ordered to pay £5,000 in compensation.

Cardiff University: Tumour drug trial 'could lead to autism benefits'

"This research is one of the first clinical trials to assess whether a drug can improve brain function in people with an inherited disorder.

"The potential benefits of this treatment include an improved quality of life for affected patients and wider benefits for their families and carers.

"If it works it will benefit patients directly and could provide clues as to whether this class of drugs (called mTOR inhibitors) might have wider benefits in problems like autism."

– Professor Julian Sampson, Institute of Medical Genetics at Cardiff University

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Tumour-shrinking drug's wider benefits

Trials of a new drug are underway at Cardiff University Credit: David Davies/PA Archive/Press Association Images

A drug designed to combat Tuberous Sclerosis is being trialled at Cardiff University and could also be used to treat autism. Everolimus has already proven effective when used to treat kidney growths and grain tumours - reducing their size in many cases.

Tuberous Sclerosis is a genetic disorder characterised by the development of tumours in many organs, including the skin and kidneys. It can also affect the brain, leading to epilepsy and often ADHD and autism.

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