Hypodermic needle

Serious hospital errors listed

Information uncovered by Welsh Lib Dems shows 24 medical errors including swabs and a hypodermic needle left inside patients

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'No suggestion other patients affected' says health board

Allison Williams, chief executive of Cwm Taf University Health Board, says she recognises there is public concern over the ongoing investigation. She says the health board will work with police to "get to the bottom of what happened."

Cwm Taf University Health Board takes the care and safety of its patients extremely seriously. As soon as staff identified that there was a problem with the patient concerned, they acted quickly and appropriately. We are continuing to work with the police to do everything we can to get to the bottom of what happened.

We would like to emphasise that there is no suggestion that any other patients have been affected.

– Allison Williams, Cwm Taf University Health Board

She added that anyone with concerns about the care of their relatives are encouraged to talk to ward staff who can arrange for them to speak with a senior member of the health board.

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Cwm Taf services 'unaffected' say health council

Cwm Taf Community Health Council says it welcomes the health board's 'prompt action.' Dr Paul Worthington, the council's chief officer, said he has spoken to the health board and been reassured that the delivery of services was unaffected.

We are aware of the fact that an unexplained injury was sustained by a patient at Ysbyty Cwm Cynon. This is clearly a very serious issue and our thoughts and sincere condolences go to the family at this very sad time.

We welcome the prompt action by the health board in initiating the multi-agency review process to consider what happened. This swift response was both right and essential.

We are aware that staff are being interviewed as part of the ongoing process of investigation into the incident, and it would not be appropriate to comment in detail until that investigation is completed.

– Dr Paul Worthington, Cwm Taf Community Health Council

Hospital death woman named locally

An elderly woman, who died after sustaining an 'unexplained and serious injury' in hospital, has been named locally as Tegwen Roderick.

The 88 year old, from Abercanaid in Merthyr Tydfil, died at the town's Prince Charles Hospital yesterday.

Mrs Roderick suffered an 'unexplained and serious injury' while being treated at Ysbyty Cwm Cynon in Mountain Ash last Thursday.

Ten members of staff have since been suspended and police are investigating.

Hospital staff suspended after elderly patient death

An 88-year-old woman sustained injuries at Ysbyty Cwm Cynon last week Credit: Cwm Taf University Health Board

Ten members of staff have been suspended after the death of an elderly woman.

The 88-year-old woman died at Prince Charles Hospital in Merthyr Tydfil today after suffering an "unexplained and serious injury" at Ysbyty Cwm Cynon in Mountain Ash last Thursday.

Cwm Taf University Health Board say the staff were on duty the night before and the morning after the injuries were sustained. It added the suspensions are a "precautionary measure".

South Wales Police say they are investigating and four people are assisting officers with their enquiries.

A spokesperson for Cwm Taf University Health Board said:

'On Thursday morning, as part of routine patient care, a patient at Ysbyty Cwm Cynon was identified as having an unexplained injury.

'Appropriate arrangements were made for transfer to Prince Charles Hospital in Merthyr Tydfil. As is always the case in such a situation, the Health Board initiated a multi-agency strategy meeting to be held to consider the circumstances. This took place the following day.

'Staff on duty at the time are in the process of being interviewed to assist the investigation and the family have been kept fully informed of the situation.'

The health board added it has not made any link between the patient's injuries and her death.

A post-mortem is due to take place tomorrow.

Welsh Govt 'working to improve diabetes education'

The Welsh Government says its diabetes strategy is working to deliver better healthcare for those with the condition, as well as focusing on the need for improved education.

It comes after a report by charity Diabetes UK Cymru said millions of pounds spent caring for people in Wales with diabetes isn't being used effectively.

A Welsh Government spokesperson said: “The Together for Health - Diabetes Delivery Plan, which was launched in September 2013, puts patient awareness and support at the heart of the Welsh Government’s diabetes strategy.

“A key element is the introduction of a diabetes patient management system, which will allow clinicians to deliver better healthcare for people with diabetes.

"The plan also focuses on the need for education about diabetes so patients are fully involved in their care and able to contribute to the development of their personalised care plans.

“Health boards and NHS trusts have also developed their own plans to prevent diabetes and reduce the risk of long-term diabetic complications for their populations.”

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'Address diabetes issues early' to save money and lives

The Director of Diabetes UK Cymru has warned that an 'eye-watering' amount of diabetes care money "isn't being used effectively".

The Welsh NHS spends around £500 million per year on diabetes care, but the charity says that money is mostly spent on treating complications instead of preventative care.

[Our] report shows how dealing with problems early, costs could be greatly reduced and more people would live longer and healthier lives.

With such strong evidence, it is bewildering that health boards have clear plans to deliver these services and then fail to actually make them happen in practice.

Put simply, if a service is shown to improve the care provided to people with diabetes and save money, why on earth should it not be delivered universally and as quickly as possible?

– Dai Williams, Diabetes UK Cymru

Mr Williams cited improved provision of diabetes education and better foot care as two examples of good healthcare that could help prevent more long-term complications arising.

Diabetes money 'not being used effectively' says charity

Diabetes UK says money spent on treating the condition isn't used effectively. Credit: Hugo Philpott/PA Wire

Money spent caring for people in Wales with diabetes isn't being used effectively, according to the charity Diabetes UK.

NHS Wales spends around £500million a year on diabetes care. But the charity says most of that is spent treating complications that could have been prevented through good healthcare.

The Welsh Government says its diabetes strategy is working to improve healthcare and reduce the risk of long-term complications.

Ed Miliband meets Welsh NHS protesters on Cardiff visit

Labour leader Ed Miliband has had an unplanned meeting with campaigners calling for an inquiry into death rates in Welsh hospitals.

He agreed to listen to their concerns when they turned up at his walkabout in Cardiff City centre.

Other protestors also tried to overshadow his visit, as our Political Editor Adrian Masters reports.

Ed Miliband meets campaigners calling for NHS inquiry

Ed Miliband has met with campaigners calling for a Keogh-style inquiry into Welsh hospitals after his walkabout in Cardiff city centre.

The Labour leader is in the city as part of the party's Euro elections campaign and will launch a 'cost of living contract.'

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Ed Miliband keeping his promise and meeting Gareth Williams campaigner for a public inquiry into Welsh hospitals. http://t.co/om20reBWAp

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