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Work underway to control rhododendrons in Snowdonia

Rhododendrons are popular garden plants, but in Snowdonia they are spreading beyond control.

The rhododendrons now cover over two thousand hectares of Snowdonia alone. There's concern that it could damage the fragile eco-system there by stopping other plants from growing.

Rhododendrons are popular garden plans Credit: Royal Horticultural Society

There are many different types of rhododendron which can make them difficult to identify.

Often the plants can be identified by their colourful, bell-shaped flowers which are often in round clusters.

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Battle to control rhododendrons in Snowdonia

The plant covers huge areas of Snowdonia National Park Credit: Snowdonia National Park

The battle is on in Snowdonia to eradicate rhododendrons which now cover over 2,000 hectares of land. The plant damages the fragile eco-system because the dense evergreen foliage means few plants can compete against them. Existing native vegetation can be virtually wiped out.

Rhododendrons are also very difficult to kill, often requiring several attempts to inject or cut back and burn bushes before they are finally eradicated. A single bush can produce one million tiny seeds per year, so can spread to cover vast areas if left unchecked.

Rhododendron ponticum, the common purple flowered rhododendron, was introduced into large gardens in Victorian times. Conditions in the park have proved perfect and they have spread rapidly since then.

Conservation organisations are working with local gardeners to persuade them to replace the bushes with non-invasive species.

Man dies after falling 500ft from Snowdon

Crews from RAF Valley were called to recover the man's body and winch his friend to safety Credit: John Stillwell/PA Wire

A man has died after falling hundreds of feet while climbing Snowdon with a friend.The 21 year old was descending from the summit yesterday when he went down a steep grassy slope and fell 500 feet from a cliff.

His body was recovered by an RAF rescue helicopter from Valley, Anglesey. The man's walking companion was heard calling for help from the mountainside and winched to safety.

100ft cliff rescue for Snowdonia walkers

Snowdonia National Park is a popular destination for walkers Credit: PA

A rescuer was lowered 100ft down a Snowdonia cliff to aid three men who were stuck after making a navigational error last night.

Twelve members of the Ogwen mountain rescue team turned out to the Idwal Slabs after one of the group dialled 999.

The three men, from Portsmouth, were then hauled up the cliff one by one by rope.

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20 walkers rescued after getting lost without a map

Snowdonia National Park is a popular destination for walkers Credit: PA

A group of 20 walkers had to be rescued yesterday after they got lost on a Snowdonia hillside.

The group, from London, were walking without a map or compass, and were following a route they had downloaded from the Internet.

The Aberglaslyn Mountain Rescue Team received a call from a member of the group at around 15.43, who said they were lost.

They knew they were near Beddgelert, but couldn't find their way down from their location.

9 Team Members and 1 Land Rover Ambulance were deployed from the Team's Headquarters at Porthmadog, but luckily were not needed.

Gethin Edwards from the Aberglaslyn Team said:

"Knowing where you are on the map and where to go next are key skills.

There are a few simple map and compass techniques that form the basis for all good navigation and knowledge of their use and their possession is essential to being safe in the hills"

Two walkers in Snowdonia struck by lightning

Two walkers in Snowdonia were rescued yesterday afternoon, after being struck by lightning.

The men, aged 37 and 58 from Buckinghamshire, suffered burned feet, after they were struck near the summit Aran Fawddwy, a mountain in south Snowdonia.

Members of a mountain rescue team were joined by an RAF helicopter based at Valley in Anglesey and were flown to hospital in Bangor for treatment.

Snowdonia's Tryfan peak 'has a unique asthetic'

The view along the Nant Ffrancon Valley Credit: /Press Association

Tryfan was described as a "worthy winner" by Trail magazine editor Simon Ingram.

""Tryfan has a unique aesthetic and has always been a mountain close to the heart of hillwalkers who love a challenging afternoon out" he said.

"Snowdon may be the the superstar of the region but Tryfan is the bristly underdog, providing just the right mix of the accessible and the thrilling - great to look at, and a real mountaineer's peak."

The UK's highest mountain, Ben Nevis in Scotland, came in eighth place, while England's highest peak, Scafell Pike, was in 13th place, receiving just 2% of the vote in the poll of 1,201 people.

Tryfan in Snowdonia named UK's favourite mountain

Tryfan is described as "a real mountaineer's peak" Credit: Rob Formstone/PA Wire

A Welsh peak has been named the UK's favourite mountain for hillwalkers, beating its more famous neighbour Snowdon.

Tryfan in Snowdonia topped a survey by hillwalking magazine Trail, with Helvellyn in the Lake District coming second and Wales' highest mountain Snowdon securing third place.

Tryfan was described as a "worthy winner" by the magazine's editor Simon Ingram.

""Tryfan has a unique aesthetic and has always been a mountain close to the heart of hillwalkers who love a challenging afternoon out" he

The UK's highest mountain, Ben Nevis in Scotland, came in eighth place, while England's highest peak, Scafell Pike, was in 13th place, receiving just 2% of the vote in the poll of 1,201 people.

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