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Union backs Swansea lagoon proposals

One of the largest unions in Wales, Unite, has thrown its weight behind proposals to bring a tidal lagoon to Swansea Bay.

Credit: Artist Impression

The £800m project could provide electricity for thousands of homes in Wales.

It's expected to be completed by 2018.

The union understands the project will create over 1900 full time jobs during the construction phase, with further jobs becoming available post construction.

“The lagoon is both superb and significant in terms of the vision, energy and employment potential it could bring to Wales. It represents the beginning of a whole new industry in South West Wales and opens the door of opportunity to sustainable skills and jobs that will not only be good for Welsh workers but for the wider Welsh economy."

– Andy Richards, Unite Wales

You can see more on this story on Coast and Country tonight on ITV Cymru Wales at 8pm.

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Environmental group issues cautious welcome to Swansea lagoon as planning application submitted

Friends of the Earth Cymru have issued a cautious welcome to the Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon project, which is submitting its planning application today.

Provided they meet strict environmental criteria, tidal lagoons can play a key role in building a low-carbon future, supplying clean electricity to many thousands of homes.

With its huge coastline, the UK has plenty of potential for developing more schemes like this - along with other renewable forms of energy.

We look forward to reading the detailed application for Swansea's tidal lagoon, to satisfy ourselves that we can give this potentially valuable project our full support.

– Gareth Clubb, Director, Friends of the Earth Cymru

Swansea lagoon planning application a 'major step'

The submission of a planning application today for a tidal lagoon in Swansea Bay marks a "major step" towards realising one of the UK's "most game-changing infrastructure projects", according to the CEO of Tidal Lagoon Power, Mark Shorrock.

The project would see a 9.5 km long sea wall built to capture enough renewable energy from incoming and outgoing tides to power over 120,000 homes for 120 years

Today marks a major step towards realising one of the UK's most game-changing infrastructure projects: the world's first tidal lagoon power plant.

Until now, tidal energy has been heavily promoted by governments and environmentalists as an intuitive source of clean and reliable energy for our island nation, but the business response has focused on relatively small-scale tidal stream devices.

The UK has the second highest tidal range in the world and today we are submitting an application for a development that will prove that this resource can be harnessed in a way that makes economic, environmental and social sense.

Tidal lagoons offer renewable energy at nuclear scale and thus the investment of hundreds of millions of pounds in UK industries and coastal communities.

Our intention is to supply 10 per cent of the UK's domestic electricity by building at least five full-scale tidal lagoons in UK waters by 2023, before the UK sees any generation from new nuclear.

Swansea Bay has a fantastic opportunity here to capitalise on first move advantage. We are delighted with the support to date and thank everybody for their help and encouragement so far including those local people who have taken the opportunity to invest in the project.

– Mark Shorrock, CEO of Tidal Lagoon Power

Swansea lagoon planning application to be submitted

The planning application for a tidal lagoon in Swansea Bay will be submitted today, which has been developed through "extensive consultation" over the last three years.

It will now be reviewed by the Planning Inspectorate before public examination and then determined by the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change. Natural Resources Wales will consider an application for the marine license that is required.

The project would see a 9.5 km long sea wall built to capture enough renewable energy from incoming and outgoing tides to power over 120,000 homes for 120 years.

Tidal Lagoon Power Limited has spent millions of pounds over the last three years developing its proof-of-concept project, alongside a consortium of internationally-renowned industrial businesses.

Concerns raised about tidal lagoon plans

A new report says the development of a tidal lagoon in Swansea Bay could create nearly 2,000 jobs and bring £300m to the local economy.

But, concerns have been raised about the plans, with some locals questioning the environmental and visual impact the structure will have on the bay.

Although the lagoon will give facilities for water sports that will obviously attract some tourists to the city, tourism in the Mumbles and Gower area will be adversely affected.

Once it's here we will be stuck with it for over a 100 years.

– Anthony Colburn, Mumbles Councillor

Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay Ltd, the company behind the development, say the earliest work could start on the construction is 2015, should the UK Government give it the green light.

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Wales 'could become world leader in tidal energy'

The firm behind plans for a massive tidal power station for Swansea Bay have revealed details of their proposals today.

The scheme would trap the tide in a vast lagoon and release it through turbines to generate electricity.

If it's given the go-ahead, the project would cost £750m and provide more than enough power for a city the size of Swansea.

The Chief Executive of Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay has told ITV News that Wales could become a world leader in tidal energy.

  1. Lorna Prichard

Swansea Bay shows itself off in City of Culture bid

A coach full of choristers, ice cream makers and football fans made their way from Mumbles to the Houses of Parliament yesterday, to show minsters what Swansea has got going for it.

Swansea Bay is competing against three other places - Dundee, Hull and Leicester - to be named Britain's City of Culture in 2017.

The prestigious title is held by a city every four years.

More than 5,000 smoking deaths in Wales per year

Children and young people have a right to play and meet with their friends in a clean environment free from second hand smoke and cigarette litter.

Smoking in family-friendly places such as playgrounds also creates the impression for them that it's a harmless activity but the reality is that smoking kills more than 5,000 people a year in Wales.

– Elen de Lacy, chief executive of public health charity ASH Wales
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