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Steel workers set to march to put pressure on UK government

Credit: Benjamin Wright/PA Wire

Hundreds of steelworkers are to stage a march in London to keep pressure on the Government to help secure the future of their crisis-hit industry.

Workers from plants across the country will gather on May 25 before walking past Downing Street and Parliament.

Those taking part work for several companies, including Tata, which is selling its loss-making UK assets, including the huge plant at Port Talbot in south Wales.

The steelworkers will demand that the Government works to ensure a responsible sale of Tata Steel and deliver a proper industrial strategy to support the entire steel sector throughout the current crisis.

For months, the Save Our Steel campaign has engaged hundreds of thousands of people across the UK.

This march will bring steelworkers to London to focus all our attention on delivering a clear message to government: save our jobs, support our communities and deliver the fantastic future for British steel making we know it can have.

– Roy Rickhuss, general secretary of the Community union

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UCATT union: 'Members won't stand idly by'

UCATT members employed by Tata Steel have voted overwhelmingly for strike action.

It's due to a running dispute over the company’s plans to close the British Steel Pension Scheme.

UCATT members voted 95.1% for strike action and by 94.9% for action short of strike action on an 80% turnout.

This result shows that members are not going to stand idly by and allow Tata to close their pension scheme.

It is now imperative for Tata to swiftly return to the negotiating table to resolve this dispute.

– Nick Blundell, Regional Secretary for UCATT Wales and South West Region

Tata steel workers vote for strike action

The Port Talbot plant employs almost 4,000 Credit: PA

Union workers at Tata steel have voted to take strike action over their pensions.

The company says it is 'disappointed' saying it is "proposing to continue providing employees with highly attractive and competitive pensions".

Tata steel says it remains hopeful that employees will avoid taking any action that damages its objective of building a successful and sustainable UK business capable of supporting a secure pension scheme.

Retirement age would change.

Tata awaits result of strike ballot

The Port Talbot plant employs almost 4,000. Credit: Anthony Devlin / PA

Steel giant Tata which employs thousands in Wales will hear today if it faces the threat of strikes by workers in a dispute over pensions.

Members of the Community, Ucatt and GMB unions have been voting on whether to launch a campaign of action in protest at plans to close the British Steel Pension Scheme to future accrual.

The proposed changes to the scheme could see workers retiring at 65 instead of 60.

The unions urged their members to vote in favour of strike action and for other forms of industrial action.

Ballot results are due today, while Unite members are still voting until next week.

Talks were held last week but failed to break the deadlocked row, with unions describing consultations as a "sham".

Credit: Roland Weihrauch/DPA/PA Images

Officials accused Tata of a "flagrant disregard" for the views of employees.

The company said almost 5,000 workers had attended more than 100 pension roadshows in 20 locations across the UK in recent weeks, while 2,000 letters and emails had been sent.

Employees had expressed a "clear understanding" of the challenges facing the pension scheme.

Tata said it would consider the feedback, but continued to believe that any pension options must address the scheme's deficit

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