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Speedboat driver tried to confront Tunisia attack gunman

Attacker Seifeddine Rezgui killed 20 people on the beach at Sousse, eight inside the hotel and 10 on the hotel grounds. Credit: AP

The inquest into the Tunisia beach massacre has been shown CCTV and heard more details of the gun attack, including how reports of a second gunman may have been sparked by a speedboat driver who tried to confront attacker Seifeddine Rezgui.

Rezgui had thrown a grenade at an armed guard who opened fire on him as the extremist entered the Imperial Marhaba hotel from the beach with an automatic weapon, the hearing at London's Royal Courts of Justice was told.

Samantha Leek QC, counsel to the inquest, said the guard fell to the ground "seemingly unconscious" at which point the local speedboat driver, named as AI, picked his gun up and attempted to confront Rezgui but could not work the weapon as the attacker continued to claim a total of 38 lives.

Ms Leek said Rezgui was thought to have acted alone on the beach having been dropped off by an accomplice.

The inquest was shown CCTV of a white Peugeot van dropping the gunman off then driving away before Rezgui - hiding his weapon in a parasol - opened fire.

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Tunisian security 'delayed their arrival' at attack hotel

Local investigators criticised police for a slow response to the killing in front of the five-star Riu Imperial Marhaba Hotel. Credit: PA

Tunisian police "deliberately and unjustifiably" delayed their arrival to the scene of the Sousse terrorist attack in which 30 Britons were killed, the inquest into the June 2015 massacre has heard.

Samantha Leek QC, counsel to the inquest, said a report by Tunisian Judge Akremi had identified failings by local units that could have ended the slaughter earlier.

Police arrived and shot extremist Seifeddine Rezgui Yacoubi dead after he had claimed the lives of 38 tourists on the beach outside the five-star Riu Imperial Marhaba Hotel.

The hearing packed with relatives of the victims at the Royal Courts of Justice in London heard an unnamed interior minister had told the judge some Tunisian security officers stalled on purpose.

He said the units that should have intervened in the events deliberately and unjustifiably slowed down to delay their arrival at the hotel.

They had the ability to put an end to the attack before the police arrived but wasted a considerable amount of time in getting to the hotel.

– Samantha Leek QC, counsel to the inquest

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Lord Hain pays tribute to Fidel Castro

Lord Hain. Credit: PA

The former Labour Cabinet minister and anti-apartheid leader Peter Hain, now Lord Hain, has paid tribute to former Cuban president Fidel Castro, who has died aged 90.

He said: "Although responsible for indefensible human rights and free speech abuses, Castro created a society of unparalleled access to free health, education and equal opportunity despite an economically throttling USA siege.

"His troops inflicted the first defeat on South Africa's troops in Angola in 1988, a vital turning point in the struggle against apartheid."

Cardiff journalist recalls Fidel Castro calling her his 'Celtic cousin'

Lila Haines, an independent journalist based in Cardiff, has spoken to ITV News about meeting Fidel Castro in the 1990s.

Lila Haines meeting Fidel Castro in the 1990s Credit: Lila Haines

The former Cuban leader's death was announced by his brother, Raul Castro, the incumbent Cuban president, on state television late on Friday.

Fidel Castro's death has been announced by his brother Credit: TNS/ABACA/ABACA/PA Images

Ms Haines lived and worked in Cuba in the late 1980s and early 1990s, and met the leader several times.

He called her a 'Celtic cousin', and told her that he always had to remind his people that Wales is not England.

Listen to Lila Haines talk about meeting Fidel Castro:

A divisive figure, Fidel Castro was seen as both pariah and people's champion.

He built a communist state on the doorstep of the United States and defied US efforts to topple him for five decades.

The former Welsh Secretary Peter Hain, now Lord Hain, said: "Although responsible for indefensible human rights and free speech abuses, Castro created a society of unparalleled access to free health, education and equal opportunity despite an economically throttling USA siege."

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