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Fifty thousand attend Air Tattoo at RAF Fairford

More than 50,000 people have been at RAF Fairford for the second day of the Royal International Air Tattoo.

Among the many flying displays were the Red Arrows - who are celebrating their 50th anniversary.

The event opened for the first time on a Friday this year, which allowed fans to get up close and meet the pilots and engineers.

Andy Armstrong, Chief Executive of RAF Charitable Trust Enterprises, says its been a great success:

Right-to-die campaigner welcomes Carey's backing

The widow of a man who campaigned for the right to assisted dying has welcomed a change of heart by the former Archbishop of Canterbury George Carey.

Jane Nicklinson from Melksham, who's husband Tony was paralysed, says she's delighted the former Bishop of Bath and Wells has changed his mind, and believes others in the church will now speak out in support of assisted dying.

David Woodland reports:

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Man remanded over Gloucester hospital stabbing

Sharon Wall.

A man has been remanded in custody accused of the murder of a healthcare assistant who died after being stabbed while at work in a psychiatric hospital in Gloucester.

Ryan Matthews, 61, of Wotton Lawn hospital, Horton Road, Gloucester, faced magistrates in Cheltenham charged with Sharon Wall's murder.

He spoke only to confirm his name, address, date of birth and that he understood the charge he faces during the three minute hearing.

Matthews is accused of the murder of Ms Wall on July 9 at the hospital, which is run by the 2gether NHS Foundation Trust.

Emma Davies, representing Matthews, did not make any representations on her client's behalf.

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Tony Nicklinson's widow says he would have been 'really pleased'

Jane Nicklinson with daughter Lauren. The family have pledged to carry on Tony's right-to-die fight.
Jane Nicklinson with daughter Lauren. The family have pledged to carry on Tony's right-to-die fight. Credit: PA

The widow of locked-in syndrome sufferer Tony Nicklinson, who tirelessly campaigned to have the right to end his life, has said he would be 'really pleased' the former Archbishop of Canterbury's is backing laws to legalise assisted dying.

Jane Nickinson lost Tony two years ago but said she was 'amazed and thrilled' at Lord Carey's U-turn on the issue.

She told BBC 5 live's Stephen Nolan: "This is huge because the Church has always been one of our greatest opponents.

"I think Tony moved a lot of people but to hear he moved someone in such a prominent position - someone who is willing to come out and openly support our position - I'm just over the moon about it.

"I'm really pleased and I know Tony would be as well."

Mrs Nicklinson and paralysed former builder Paul Lamb lost a right-to-die fight in the UK's highest court last month, but said they were hopeful that change would come.

Case of Tony Nicklinson changed Lord Carey's mind

Tony Nicklinson was paralysed in 2005 after suffering a stroke. Credit: PA

Former Archbishop of Canterbury Lord Carey has said he changed his views on assisted dying after being inspired by the case of a locked-in syndrome sufferer from Wiltshire.

Tony Nicklinson from Melksham battled for seven years to have the right to end his own life but it was refused and he died naturally aged 58 in 2012.

Writing in the Daily Mail, Lord Carey said: "It was the case of Tony Nicklinson that exerted the deepest influence on me,"

"Here was a dignified man making a simple appeal for mercy, begging that the law allow him to die in peace, supported by his family.

"His distress made me question my motives in previous debates. Had I been putting doctrine before compassion, dogma before human dignity?"

Former Bishop of Bath & Wells backs right-to-die

Lord Carey was Bishop of Bath and Wells between 1988 and 1991. Credit: PA

A former Archbishop of Canterbury and Bishop of Bath and Wells has broken free with the Church of England's stance on assisted dying and said it would not be 'anti-Christian' to legalise it.

Writing in the Daily Mail, George Carey said he would be backing legislation tabled by Lord Falconer which proposes allowing doctors to prescribe a lethal dose to terminally ill patients with less than six months to live.

He warned that by opposing reform the Church risked 'promoting anguish and pain.'

It marks an extraordinary U-turn by the 78-year-old cleric, who was Bishop of Bath and Wells between 1988 and 1991, before becoming Archbishop of Canterbury.

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