NHS computer system "failed" Samuel

The inquest into Samuel Starr's death, says he died after a new NHS computer system "failed" to book a vital hospital scan.

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The moment deaf and blind girl heard for the first time

Chloe Ring from Devon was born both deaf and blind but now the parents of the five year old have released remarkable video footage of the moment when she heard for the first time.

When she was just 14 months old Chloe was fitted with two cochlear implants at Bristol Children's Hospital. The operation changed the little girl's life. Her parents have now posted their amazing home video on YouTube. Seth Conway reports

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Smoking can make your children fatter

Smoking isn't just bad for YOU - it can also make your children fatter. That's the conclusion from the latest Children of the 90s study.

The group based at Bristol University is following the health and development of more than 10,000 youngsters.

They've found that starting smoking at a young age can lead to problems for the next generation. Caron Bell reports.

Hospital trust admits failings over brain-damaged baby

The parents of a baby boy who suffered catastrophic injuries at birth are to receive a lifetime settlement to pay for his care after a hospital in Bristol admitted liability.

Midwives at St Michael's Hospital made a series of errors which led to Ollie Lewis suffering brain damage when he was born two years ago. The trust that runs the hospital has now agreed to pay his parents, who live in Weston Super Mare, for his continuing care.

Ollie's father Neil Lewis says the admission has left him and his partner Charmaine Malcolm with mixed emotions.

Of course, we are relieved that Ollie's future will be financially secure and that the trust has admitted its mistakes, but at the same time it's hard to come to terms with the fact that our son is permanently brain-damaged because of failures by the midwifery team and hospital.

We trusted the hospital staff and believed they would do everything possible to keep Charmaine and Ollie safe, so to know this wasn't the case has left us feeling angry, confused and frustrated.

Ollie is a remarkable little boy and we are incredibly proud of him, but nothing can turn back the clock.

– Neil Lewis, Father

Plea for defibrillators at all sports grounds

A 14-year-old boy from Wiltshire who collapsed during a football match has been reunited with the surgeon who saved his life.

Quinton Barham suffered a heart attack on the pitch in February last year. Since then he's made a remarkable recovery.

Today he met with his surgeon at Bristol City's Ashton Gate stadium.

Quinton's dad, Paul, now wants defibrillators like the one that kept his son alive, at all sports grounds in the country.

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Young Bristol heart patient reunited with surgeon

Quinton Barham with Professor Massimo Caputo at Ashton Gate this morning. Credit: ITV News West Country

A 14-year-old boy from Wiltshire who collapsed during a football match has been reunited with the surgeon from Bristol Royal Hospital for Children who saved his life.

Quinton Barham suffered a heart attack on the pitch in February last year. Since then he's made a remarkable recovery.

Today he met with his surgeon, Professor Massimo Caputo, at Bristol City's Ashton Gate stadium.

Rare blood group stocks running 'dangerously low'

Stocks of rare blood groups are running 'dangerously low' and the consequences could ultimately cost lives, experts are warning.

Demand for O negative and B negative is growing but the number of donors with that match is in decline. One centre in Bristol is urging people to come forward now to prevent a potential crisis later.

Richard Payne reports:

Bristol blood centre urges donors to come forward

Stocks of rare blood groups are running 'dangerously low' and the consequences could ultimately cost lives, experts are warning.

Demand for O negative and B negative is growing but the number of donors with that match is in decline.

One centre in Bristol is urging people to come forward now to prevent a potential crisis later.

Penny Mannings from the NHS's Bristol Donor Centre explains:

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