NHS computer system "failed" Samuel

The inquest into Samuel Starr's death, says he died after a new NHS computer system "failed" to book a vital hospital scan.

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Operation would have been "simpler" if done earlier

Samuel Starr Credit: Family photograph

The inquest into the death of a 3 year old boy has heard from a surgeon from the Bristol Royal Hospital for Children.

Samuel Starr underwent complex heart surgery at the hospital when he was just 9 months old. The surgeon who operated on him today admitted he had never operated on a child with that amount of narrowing and that his operation would have been 'simpler' if it had been performed earlier.

Samuel Starr's surgeon says he was 'very disappointed' when the young boy woke up after surgery and had suffered a stroke. He told the inquest he had never operated on a child with that amount of narrowing.

Yesterday the inquest was told a new computer system failed to generate check up appointments at the nearby Royal United Hospital in Bath.

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Inquest into toddler's death will hear from hospital

Three-year-old Samuel Starr Credit: Family

The inquest into the death of a three-year-old boy will hear from the Bristol Royal Hospital for Children later.

Samuel Starr underwent complex heart surgery at the hospital when he was just nine months old. Yesterday the inquest was told that a new computer system failed to generate check up appointments at the nearby Royal United Hospital in Bath.

Norovirus closes wards at Gloucestershire hospitals

Two wards at Gloucestershire's two main hospitals have been closed to prevent patients from contracting an airborne sickness bug.The Avening Ward at Cheltenham Hospital and Ward 4A at Gloucestershire Royal Hospital are subject to visiting restrictions due to the outbreak of Norovirus.

A spokeswoman for the Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Trust said the illness is usually over within 48 hours but is highly infectious, which is why the Trust needs to limit the number of people moving in and out of the affected ward.

Exceptions can be made for relatives hoping to visit on compassionate grounds. These visitors are being asked to speak to a member of ward staff on entering the ward.The visiting restrictions will be reviewed every day and lifted as soon as possible.This is a precautionary measure and good infection control practice to protect patients and control the spread of the illness.We hope that families and friends will understand why we are asking them not to visit for this short period.We hope to be in a position to re-introduce visiting on these wards in a matter of days.

– Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Trust spokeswoman

Samuel Starr inquest opens

Samuel Starr Credit: Family photograph

An inquest has heard that a 3 year old boy died following an operation at the Bristol Children's Hospital after huge delays to his follow up appointments.

Samuel Starr, who was from Frome, was born with a serious heart condition and was supposed to have regular scans at the Royal United Hospital in Bath to check if his condition had worsened.

This morning on inquest heard he wasn't seen properly by doctors for 20 months.

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Do you know the three main symptoms of ovarian cancer?

As Bristol Council launches an ovarian cancer awareness campaign, here are the disease's three main symptoms, according to the NHS:

  • Increased abdominal size and persistent bloating (i.e. not bloating that comes and goes)
  • Persistent pelvic and abdominal pain
  • Difficulty eating, and feeling full quickly, or feeling nauseous

Read more: Bristol City Council launches ovarian cancer campaign

Bristol Council launches ovarian cancer campaign

Bristol City Council has begun a campaign to raise awareness of ovarian cancer - the fifth most common cancer for women in the city. It is known as the 'silent killer' as patients often have no symptoms for as long as a year.

Fewer than half of patients survive, five years after diagnosis. But survival rates can be greatly increased by early intervention.

It is the sort of disease that GPs may only see once in their career so we’re also using doctors who are familiar with ovarian cancer to promote awareness in the profession. While we are in communities talking about women’s cancers through March we’ll be recruiting new ‘cancer champions’ to help raise awareness and become a point of contact in their localities.

– Cllr Barbara Janke, Assistant Mayor for Health, Bristol City Council

Click here to visit the official Bristol Talks Cancer website

Attacks on ambulance crews increase

Attacks on ambulance crews are on the increase Credit: ITV News West Country

There's been an increase in the number of reported attacks on ambulance staff in the region. There were a hundred and four reports of physical abuse to front line crews last year, according to South Western Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust.

They caused cuts, bruising and sprains as well as more serious injuries like dislocations and fractures. Seventy three cases were reported to the police and in twenty two cases the patient was arrested.

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