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The human cost of debt - how the stress of payday loans led one man to take his own life

Ian Jordan took his own life after running up huge debts Credit: Family photograph

A woman whose father took his own life after running up debts of more than 20 thousand pounds is calling on the Government to crackdown on payday loan companies.

Ian Jordan lived in Southampton. His daughter says he couldn't cope with the pressure they put him under. He was even bombarded with more than a thousand demanding text messages after his death.

Frances Walker of debt advice charity StepChange says:

"Before you take out a payday loan be very confident that you can pay it back. Don't take out more loans to pay it back and if you're rolling over, and can't afford the debt that's a really strong indicator you need help. Seek debt advice from a charity such as ours."

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Calls for crackdown on payday loans from woman whose father committed suicide

Ian Jordan committed suicide after running up huge payday loan debts Credit: PA

A Bristol woman whose father committed suicide after running up debts of more than 20 thousand pounds is calling on the Government to crackdown on the practices of payday loan companies.

Samantha Carr says her father, Ian Jordan, couldn't cope with the pressure they put him under. He was even bombarded with more than a thousand demanding text messages after he had died.

Charlotte Leslie criticises Bristol Mayor's parking plan

A controversial plan to end free parking on Bristol's Durdham Downs has been criticised by the area's MP.

Charlotte Leslie and two local councillors say Mayor George Ferguson's plan to remove 500 spaces will outrage residents and commuters who are already opposed to Residents' Parking Zones.

All-day free Durdham Down parking could be abolished

Free parking on Durdham Downs could be abolished Credit: ITV West Country/Richard Payne

All-day free parking on Bristol's historic Durdham Down could be abolished.

It's the latest controversial attempt to cut down on commuters using the city's streets. Mayor George Ferguson has divided opinion with a rapid roll-out of residents' parking zones and now risks further anger by removing the 500 spaces. He insists it's for long-term good of the city.

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Mayor: it's "irresponsible nonsense to talk of a 'black hole'"

George Ferguson says it's "irresponsible nonsense to talk of a 'black hole' Credit: Rod Minchin/PA

Questions have been raised over a thirteen million pound funding black hole for Bristol's arena project.

The Liberal Democrat Bristol City Councillor Tim Kent says the city's mayor, who is behind the scheme, hasn't given enough information on how the twelve thousand seater Arena will be financed. George Ferguson says it's "irresponsible nonsense to talk of a 'black hole' and project is a long term investment.

The £90 million plus project budget for the arena is based on a business case report but, as with all large projects, it is inevitable that there will be variances as we test some of the assumptions made in that report. The budget, agreed at Cabinet, identified £53 million from the City Deal Economic Development Fund and £38 million to come back to the council from rental and other related income.

As we move forward, of course some of the initial predictions for elements of that £38 million income will vary. This may result in the arena breaking-even earlier or later than predicted. However it must be understood that this is a long term investment that will break-even over the 25 year life of the project and will deliver millions of pounds of investment to the city region. It is irresponsible nonsense to talk of a 'black hole'.

The arena has been a long held aspiration for the city that we are now well on the way to delivering. Shortlisting teams for the design competition will start next week and, crucially, we are due to appoint an operator by the end of the year. No-one has ever pretended that this would be easy but it is a priority for Bristol and the region and the report to scrutiny shows that we are fully aware of the challenges. We are taking the necessary steps to address any potential gaps in funding whilst remaining completely committed to delivering this vitally important venue, that is a major catalyst for the regeneration of the enterprise zone and the wider city region.

– George Ferguson, Mayor of Bristol

Help for Heroes speak out against fraudster

Help for Heroes say the public have been shocked by the case of Christopher Copeland from mid-Devon, who has been jailed for stealing £300,000 through fake charity collections.

Copeland deceived the public into thinking they were making donations which would help our wounded. Instead he was stealing from them and using the money for his own personal gain through a deceptive web of fraud which took detectives three years to untangle. We have been astonished by the response of the public. Many of those defrauded by him have contacted us to express shock that someone would use organised and criminal tactics to prevent money supporting the wounded.

– Jo Brookes, Income Protection Officer at Help for Heroes

Man gets four and a half years for defrauding charity

Christopher Copeland sentenced to four and a half years Credit: ITV West Country

A man who gathered £300,000 in donations for Wiltshire charity Help For Heroes and kept the money for himself has been sentenced to four and a half years in prison.

52 year old Christopher Copeland from mid-Devon admitted fraud and money laundering at Exeter Crown Court.

He had a team of staff, who believed they were raising money for charity legitimately, who took old military vehicles, branded with the Help for Heroes logo, to supermarkets and shopping centres all over the country. The money raised never reached the charity but was instead used to subsidise Mr Copeland's own business which was in financial difficulty and has since gone into liquidation.

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