Barry George At High Court

Barry George, who spent eight years in prison after being wrongly convicted of the murder of TV presenter Jill Dando, learns today whether he has won a High Court battle for compensation

Barry George denied compensation after wrongful conviction

by Robert Murphy

The man wrongly imprisoned for the murder of Jill Dando has lost his court battle to apply for compensation. Barry George spent eight years in custody for the murder of the Somerset-born television presenter.

He was acquitted by a jury at a retrial in 2008. No one else has been charged. Today Barry George was told he couldn't apply for damages as he was not deemed 'innocent enough'.

Barry George loses compensation bid

Barry George has lost his High Court bid Credit: PA

Barry George, who spent eight years in prison after being wrongly convicted of the murder of TV presenter Jill Dando, has lost his High Court bid for compensation as a victim of a "miscarriage of justice".

Two judges rejected his claim that the Justice Secretary unfairly and unlawfully decided he was "not innocent enough to be compensated".

Lord Justice Beatson and Mr Justice Irwin ruled that the Secretary of State was "entirely justified in the conclusion he reached."

Miss Dando, who was from Weston-Super-Mare was shot dead outside her home in Fulham in April 1999.

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Barry George compensation decision due

Barry George has challenged a decision to deny him compensation Credit: PA

Barry George, who spent eight years in prison after being wrongly convicted of the murder of TV presenter Jill Dando, learns today whether he has won a High Court battle for compensation as a victim of a "miscarriage of justice".

He argues that - despite his unanimous acquittal by a jury at a retrial - a Ministry of Justice "functionary" unfairly and unlawfully decided he was "not innocent enough to be compensated".

Yet for more than 30 years those acquitted on retrials in similar circumstances had been compensated, said his QC Ian Glen at a recent hearing.

The position seemed to have changed in 2008, the year Mr George was acquitted, he said.