Sick nurse blames uranium

A former army nurse from South Gloucestershire blames her potentially fatal condition - systemic sclerosis - on exposure to depleted uranium during the Second Gulf War. The substance is sometimes used to harden artillery shells and bomb cases.

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Full report: Army nurse blames uranium for life-threatening illness

A former army medic is fighting a potentially fatal condition, which she believes may have been caused by being exposed to depleted uranium while in Iraq.

The mildly radioactive substance is used in some armour piercing shells.

Katrina Brown from South Cerney has since developed a condition called systemic sclerosis and is trying to raise more than £100,000 to go to America for treatment. Watch our Gloucestershire correspondent Ken Goodwin's report.

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Army nurse blames uranium for life-threatening illness

A former army nurse from South Gloucestershire is blaming her potentially fatal condition - systemic sclerosis - on exposure to depleted uranium during the Second Gulf War. The substance is sometimes used to harden artillery shells and bomb cases.

Katrina Brown, from South Cerney in Gloucestershire, was a nurse in the army during the war. While there she was unknowingly exposed to the substance. When she left the army she was issued with a card warning her that exposure to depleted uranium can be harmful.

Now she has developed a condition called systemic sclerosis. It affects her skin and internal organs. She is busy raising money for stem cell treatment in America, the only place where it is carried out for a condition of this sort.

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