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Council takes part in Bristol Bus Review

Services 352/353

  • The council is asking that First reconsider renumbering the Weston-Super-Mare stopping service to ‘Service 1’ to align with its X1 service. The council feels that two ‘1’ services operating in the same city and sometimes stopping in the same places could confuse passengers.

Service 40

  • The council does not want to see the service lost between Downleaze and Julian Road in Stoke Bishop, and has offered to look again at parking restrictions and enforcement in the area if it would help persuade First to keep operating the route.

Service 20

  • The council feels that the proposed loss of the direct link from the south of the city to the BRI is a backwards step which could harm already disadvantaged communities. It is calling for First to consider a suitable replacement.

Council's response to bus review

Bristol City Council has published its response to First Bus' review of services.

The bus operator launched the three month consultation in April.

The Council said it would reconsider parking restrictions in Stoke Bishop if it would help persuade First to keep a service between Downleaze and Julian Road.

Bristol’s Assistant Mayor for Transport, Planning, Strategic Housing and Regeneration, Labour Cllr Mark Bradshaw, has written to First Bus Interim Managing Director for Bristol, Paul Matthews outlining the council’s response:

I do have a major concern that bus service changes are taking place in an ad hoc manner and not as part of a wider network strategy to significantly increase bus passenger numbers and improve citywide connectivity. As you will be aware, the Council is continuing to invest in upgrades to bus stops, bus priorities and other measures to reduce delays and I need to be sure that these will have a long life and not be rendered redundant through subsequent route changes.

So that bus operators and the Council can move forward with confidence, I consider that a review of the bus network would be beneficial and would welcome your views."

– Bristol’s Assistant Mayor for Transport, Planning, Strategic Housing and Regeneration, Labour Cllr Mark Bradshaw.

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Bristol bus fares consultation begins

Bristol's biggest provider of bus services, First, has begun three months of public consultations after thousands of people signed a petition asking the government to force them to lower their fares.

The company says the running costs are high, and it needs to know more about how passengers use routes before it can make any changes.

Laura Makin-Isherwood reports:

Campaigning for lower bus fares in Bristol

Protestors outside Bristol's bus station this lunchtime. Credit: ITV News West Country

Protestors have gathered outside Bristol's bus station this lunchtime.

They're calling for bus operator First to lower fares in the city.

The protest was organised by Daniel Farr, a concerned bus user who started the Make Fares Fair campaign by setting up an e-petition on the direct.gov.uk website.

The petition has collected almost 3,000 signatures.

First has agreed to hold a consultation over ticket prices - a move welcomed by the city's mayor George Ferguson.

Protestors are campaigning for lower fares in Bristol. Credit: ITV News West Country

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Bristol bus fare demo

First bus service plan to hold a consultation and review of their fares Credit: David Jones/PA Wire/Press Association Images

Commuters and local politicians will be voicing their concerns over the rise in bus fares at peaceful demonstration later [Saturday]. It will be held outside Bristol Bus station and start at 12:00pm.

It comes after First bus service announced they will be holding a consultation and review of their fares.

It has been organised by Daniel Farr a concerned bus user who started the Make Fares Fair campaign by setting up an e-petition on the direct.gov.uk website that has now collected over 2,840 signatures.

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