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Under The Skin: investigating the UK's most common cancer

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the UK, and rates are continuing to rise - with at least 100,000 new cases being diagnosed each year.

In this special series we're looking at the terrible impact of the disease, and finding out what we can all do to reduce the risk.

100,000
new cases of skin cancer diagnosed annually.

Many believe the increase in numbers is down to jetting off for two weeks of sun.

One expert at Bristol Oncology Centre told our very own Kylie Pentelow, getting burnt as a child can increase your risk of skin cancer by 80 per cent.

She's been finding out just what that holiday sun can really mean - under the skin.

80%
The increased risk of skin cancer if you get burnt as a child.

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  1. Katie Rowlett

NHS managers in the West say they 'can cope' with demand this winter

NHS managers in the West say they 'can cope' with demand Credit: PA:Lynne Cameron

There are around 40,000 deaths every year because of the cold, mainly in elderly.

It's down to simple things like people not heating their homes to at least 18°C. Just by doing this you can prevent respiratory illnesses but also colds and flu.

But also when we get a cold snap there is an Increase in fractures due to snow and ice, which also puts pressure on our A and E departments and hospital beds.

Normally NHS England South West is given its winter money now, but this year it was provided by the Government in April so health managers have been able to plan earlier.

NHS England South West says this year health and social care services have been joined up so there will not be as many bed blocking situations like we've seen in previous years.

Campaigners protest outside Royal Cornwall Hospital

A mass protest has been held at the Royal Cornwall Hospital over the privatisation of services.

Campaigners gathered at Treliske calling for an end to what they call the selling off of services.

They're handing in an 11,000 signature petition to board members today ahead of a key board meeting.

The Royal Cornwall Hospital's Trust will be discussing plans to use a private firm to help run pathology services. It says it would involve using a private laboratory, but staff would remain within the NHS.

One health campaigner Bernie Rowe, who suffers from Crohn's Disease told ITV News she has experienced a decline in care.

If I have to go in for bowel surgery I'm scared, I'm literally scared for my life, and that's no exaggeration when you look at how bad the cutbacks are, the staff don't have time, and the morale with the staff, they don't want to be harsh to patients, they don't want to be short with patients, they don't have the time to spend with them.

– Bernie Rowe

The Hospital have responded to the campaign.

We do understand the concerns of staff and of the public, and we understand those concerns in the context of outsourcing hotel services last year. We're absolutely clear about the benefits and the risks that come from each of the options, and we will be taking those into account and that will include reputation and that will include how our staff will feel impacted by those changes.

– Bill Shields, Royal Cornwall Hospital's Trust
  1. David Woodland

Family campaign for new cancer drug test

A cancer patient from Taunton who became the first teenager in Britain to have a metal port fitted to his head, has suffered a set back in his treatment.

James Willetts had a small hole put in his skull so that drugs could target the tumour directly without affecting the rest of his brain.

But it's failing to work. His family are now campaigning for a new drug to be trialled on James.

David Woodland reports.

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